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Trade Skills 4U Campaign Increases Number of Women Entering Electrical Trade

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 29th May 2018

women in electrical

Here at Trade Skills 4U, we are keen to promote the electrical industry as an inclusive career for everyone from all backgrounds. However, there’s always room for improvement, and it’s still an industry that isn’t gender proportional, with only roughly 1 in every 1,000 electrical contractors a woman.

Overcoming the challenges of working in a male dominated electrical sector

It’s also fair to say that for many years the electrical sector has suffered from a poor reputation with its ‘blokey bloke’ attitude on site from wolf-whistling at any woman that happened to pass by, coupled with the notion that women couldn’t possibly do the physical work of their male counterparts. However, it’s encouraging to know that attitudes are finally changing in the construction industry and more and more women are now entering the sector.

Employers are also now recognising that women can make a real contribution to their workforce and are far more aware of their legal responsibilities regarding equality at work thus ensuring that unacceptable behaviour is no longer tolerated on site.

Lets hear it for the girls!

We are proud to report that since November last year the number of female students training with us has risen from 1.4% to a very respectful 3.7%. We can attribute this to being at the forefront of promoting opportunities for women to enter the trade and also to our involvement in a campaign with electrical wholesalers QVS Direct as part of their Women in Electrical campaign. The campaign aims to encourage more women to train in the electrical industry as well as help those who are already there.

At Trade Skills 4U not only do we encourage female students to train with us, we also currently employ 3 female tutors who deliver courses to both new entrants and experienced electricians at our centres nationwide.

Women in Electrical campaign

One of our electrical tutors, Liliane Branca, was interviewed as part of the campaign, showing that there are many different roles available within the electrical industry if you don’t like the thought of being an electrician in the traditional sense.

Speaking about her own role in the industry training new recruits, Liliane said: “I felt like I needed a complete career change. I was working in social services but I wanted a job with less emotional involvement. It was a huge gamble but it really paid off. I got a job on a site and then went to college twice a week in the evening for three years while working. When recession hit the construction industry hard, I started teaching electrical installation and now I teach full time.”

When asked what advice she would give to other women considering the electrical industry as a career, Liliane replied: “I think it’s essential for women, and men to be honest, to remember that we can do anything. The most important thing to remember is that if you want to do something, don’t let anything get in your way. Just go for it and put everything into it. If you do that, you’ll succeed whether you’re a man or a woman.”

You can read Liliane’s full interview here and if you would like to read some case studies of women who have trained here at Trade Skills 4U, we have interviews with graduate electrical engineers Noemi Willenboeckel and Kelly Vincent of Kelly Electrics.

As well as Liliane’s interview, there are a whole host of other interviews with electricians, business owners, and industry bodies, all giving their advice and thoughts on how the industry can make itself more inclusive.

Two other interviewees from the campaign, Coleen Everitt of Alto Electrical and Natasha Clark-Withers of Get Her Trade, recognise that there is a high demand specifically for female electricians.

Natasha commented: “From the research we have done, there is a massive demand for tradeswomen, and we need to encourage women to join the industry to cope with the demand.”

As to why there is such a need, Coleen said: “I think a big part of it is a safety and trust angle. I’m easy to talk to and people like that. Many people may be more comfortable having a woman in their house rather than a man.’”

What about the physical side of the job?

People come in all shapes and sizes and when thinking of entering the electrical sector some women worry that if they are too small they might struggle with the physical side of things. However, that can actually be an advantage as electricians often need to fit into small and crowded spaces, and a small frame will allow you to get to places that a larger frame would struggle to get to.

You will also find that there is some heavy lifting, although generally only up to fifty pounds or so, which is less than in other trades. But you will find that you'll get fitter with experience and time.

If you’re interested in electrical training of any kind, use our course finder to what courses we have available. Alternatively please call one of our friendly Course Advisers on 0800 856 4448.

Categories: female electricians, women in construction, electrician training

Case Study Kenny Whittle

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 24th May 2018

 

Course: 2365 Level 2 & 3

1. What did you do before you started training to be an electrician?

Before training at Trade Skills 4U, I worked in asset management. 

2. What was your reason for training?

I chose to train as an electrician because I had grown tired with working in an office environment and travelling to the same place of work day after day. I wanted abit more variety.

3. Why did you choose the electrical field?

Before becoming an asset manager, I worked in a factory producing vehicle wiring harnesses, thus, electrical work was the obvious choice. Also, working as an electrician would allow me to work in different locations and earn good money at the sme time so it met my needs.

4. Are you working as an electrician whilst studying?

I started working as an electrician 2 months into my level 2 course, for a company that maintains the electrical systems in a newspaper printers whilst also taking on various other contracts.The 2365 course allowed me to come into the industry and prove useful to the team on day one. I also noticed that as I progressed through the course, I could continue to take on more responsibility and tasks.

5. What do you enjoy most about the course? 

As a fan of science, particularly physics, I enjoyed learning about the theory behind electricity and how to carry out cable calculations.

6. Are you struggling with any of the topics?

So far, I haven't struggled with any of the topics or modules.

7. How would you describe the facilities at TS4U?

TS4U facilities are excellent. At no point did the group lose out due to facilities not being adequate.

8. Do you have any plans to gain more electrical qualifications?

I will use TS4U in the near future to get my inspection and testing certificate. Doing the course, and it being so diverse has made me realise how much I enjoy the theoretical and designing side of the industry. So I am contemplating further qualifications in that field.

9. What advice would you give to others thinking of taking the 2365?

Just sign up and change your life for the better. The course is over before you know it and then you are away. I am disappointed with myself I didn't do it sooner.

10. What are your plans for the future?

I will spend a few years on the tools as was my initial reason for starting the course, but eventually I would like to go into designing installations and perhaps teaching later on.

Categories: qualifications, case study, electrician, trade

New Yorkshire Facility Opens with Great Success!

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 11th May 2018

On Wednesday 9th May, we officially opened our brand new Yorkshire facility on Hawthorne Park, East Leeds. The event opened with an inspirational speech from CEO Carl Bennett, who spoke about his journey to forming Trade Skills 4U in 2005 and the reasons he did so at the age of 40. Carl continued to speak about the positive impacts electrical training courses can have on people’s lives and the excellent company values we possess.

After Carl finished his speech, we heard from Leeds City Councillor Mohammed Rafique the Executive Member for Employment, Enterprise and Opportunity. Mohammed gave a warm welcome to the new centre, and stated how excited he was to introduce us to the city and regional area. He went on to mention the rate and speed Yorkshire is growing and how there is a great need for electricians and fellow tradesman in the area. He also said these newly skilled people will contribute greatly to the region.

Councillor Rafique finished by thanking us for investing in the city and said that he is looking forward to hearing about the progress students make at the centre going forward.

 

Click below to watch the video:

 

 

Once the speeches had finished, guests were invited to explore the centre and speak with tutors and staff about the various courses available. Others ventured outside to watch the Tesla car do its dance! Or have a go on the power tools supplied by Hitachi. Quest electrical wholesalers were also in attendance to speak to those who needed any advice. 

Inside the building there was a chance to win a KT63 by completing the giant Buzz-wire in the fastest time. The quickest time we recorded was an incredibly fast 35 seconds by Haider Nawaz, so a tester will be on its way to him soon! 

Throughout the afternoon there were various seminars and interactive sessions taking place that our guests were welcome to join. These included an 18th Edition Preview, Electric Vehicle charging seminar hosted by Rolec and an interactive practical and Interactive Science session. 

We are extremely happy that the day ran very smoothly and hope that our guests enjoyed the activities on offer and free food supplied by KK Catering Ltd. We’d like to give a massive thank you to everyone who attended and we hope to see you back in the centre very soon. We’re very excited for the new courses to begin on the 14th May 2018 and wish all prospective students the very best.

If you would like to visit the centre for a tour or to and speak to a tutor please contact us on: 0800 856 4448 alternatively, if you are interested in booking a course, please Click here for a full list of courses on offer at the new Yorkshire facility.

Categories: training, electrician, yorkshire, leeds

What is a cable safe zone?

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 10th May 2018

Prysmian the UK’s largest cable manufacturer with over 100 years of experience, recently asked our tutor Mark Longley MIET to write an article on what a cable safe zone is.

Mark has worked in the electrical installation sector for just short of 30 years as an apprentice, an electrician, a maintenance electrician and an educator. He has taught everyone from apprentices through to practicing electricians wishing to improve their knowledge. While working in education he has had the honour of working as a consultant and e-learning presentor for City & Guilds, including the e-learning educators Learning Lounge.

Marks article explains that a cable safe zone, simply put, is a space in which a cable can be installed in such a position that it is not liable to be damaged by impact, abrasion or penetration.

Current Wiring Regulations

The current wiring regulations sections 522.6.201 and 522.6.202 give more exacting guidance on exactly how cables should be installed to avoid damage and potential harm to the installer and/or resident.

Cable safe zone installations in ceilings and floors

522.6.201 of the wiring regulations state that a cable installed under a floor or above a ceiling shall be run in such a position that it is not liable to be damaged by contact with the floor or ceiling or their fixings. Taking this into account a cable passing through a joist within a floor or ceiling construction, or through a ceiling support (eg. under floorboards), shall be installed at least 50mm measured vertically from the top, or bottom, as appropriate of the joist or batten, or incorporate an earthed metallic covering which complies with the requirements of these Regulations for a protective conductor of the circuit concerned, such as armoured low voltage power cable, Afumex LSX™ or mineral insulated cables.

Cable safe zone installations in walls

For walls, the ruling is slightly different. The wiring regulations state here that a cable installed in a wall or partition - at a depth of less than 50 mm from a surface of the wall or partition - has to either

i. be installed in a zone within 150 mm from the top of the wall or partition, or within 150 mm of an angle formed by two adjoining walls, or partitions. Furthermore, where the cable is connected to a point accessory, or switchgear on any surface of the wall or partition, the cable may be installed in a zone either horizontally or vertically, to the point accessory or switchgear. Keeping the safe zone close to the accessory will help act as a clear indicator for homeowners and others as to where potential cables may be located. Where the location of the accessory, point or switchgear can be determined from the reverse side, a zone formed on one side of a wall of 100mm thickness or less, or partition of 100mm thickness or less extends to the reverse side, alternatively

ii. needs to comply with regulation 522.6.204. The aforementioned regulation relates to a cable incorporating an earthed metallic covering, such as Prysmian LSX.

Walls are the most common place that homeowners and other tradespeople will encounter the risk of cable penetration by drills etc. This risk should be greatly reduced when the cables are installed within the regulations outlined above.

Protecting your cable installations

522.6.203 states Irrespective of its buried depth, a cable that is concealed in a wall or a partition, where either the internal construction includes metallic parts (such as dryline partitions) other than metallic fixings such as nails, screws etc need to be provided with additional protection. The protection should come in the form of an RCD having the characteristics specified in Regulation 415.1.1 or comply with regulation 522.6.204, which again relates to a cable incorporating an earthed metallic covering.

For more information on cable safe zones, or to get a copy of the wiring regulations to ensure best practice, please click here.

The new 18th Edition of the wiring regulations is due to be published this July with changes coming into effect in January 2019.

If you are interested in an electrical training course, please visit our Course Finder page or speak to one of our friendly course advisors on 01293 529777.

Categories: cables, safe zones, electricians

Legendary rugby players to attend launch of new electrical training company in Yorkshire

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 2nd May 2018

We are extremely excited to announce that a number of Leeds Rhinos and Warrington Wolves rugby legends will be making a special appearance at the opening of our brand new state-of-the-art training facility in Leeds on the 9 May 2018.

Both clubs have an impressive track record, with the Leeds Rhinos being eight times Super League Champions and the Warrington Wolves being Champion Cup winners 2009, 2010 and 2012 and League Leaders Shield winners in 2011 and 2016.

Carl Bennett, CEO and his family are big lovers of Rugby League and not only do we at Trade Skills 4U sponsor Wolves player Chris Hill we also sponsors Culcheth Eagles Under 9’s. Carl's wife Tracey is a coach for the Warrington Wolves Foundation Under 9’s team.

A bit of fun!

To help celebrate the opening of our new facility we thought it would be fun to run a competition whereby the Leeds Rhinos compete against the Warrington Wolves in a giant Buzz-wire game challenge to see who can get the furthest in the quickest time. I’m sure the players will take this very seriously and will want to prove who has the steadiest hands!

New state-of-the-art centre

Established in 2005, Trade Skills 4U has been training 3,000 students a year from across the country for over 13 years, firstly in Gatwick and more recently Warrington and can boast that we have some of the highest pass rates in the UK.

We are now extremely pleased to be opening a new state-of-the-art centre in Yorkshire just east of Leeds, situated just off the M1 and A1. This means customers based in, Leeds, Sheffield, Hull, Scunthorpe, Harrogate and the surrounding areas can easily access the centre.  As with all our centres the Leeds facility will house advanced training classrooms built to the highest specifications all equipped with the latest technology.

The centre will officially open with an introduction from CEO Carl Bennett, followed by a talk from Leeds Councillor Mohammed Rafique, Executive Member for Employment, Enterprise and Opportunity, who will speak about skills in the region. 

The day will also include tours of the centre, free burgers and refreshments together with free interactive practical and science sessions, an 18th Edition preview seminar and a presentation on electrical vehicle charging. To find out more or to register for the free taster sessions, please visit our Leeds Launch page.

Carl Bennett said: “We are extremely excited to be opening this new centre. A lot of research was conducted in the area to ensure that this is the perfect location to run our courses from. We look forward to meeting those who are interested in entering the electrical trade, or experienced electricians joining us for the opening to see first-hand what we have on offer.”

For more information on the courses offered at the Leeds facility please click here. Alternatively please speak to one of our Course Advisers on 0800 856 4448 who will be happy to help you.

Categories: open day, new training centre, leeds training

Construction Workers To Earn More Than University Students

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 29th March 2018

construction v uni pay

Federation of Master Builders (FMB) report the average salary for electricians is £47,265

Many people considering learning a vocational qualification are often put off because it is generally perceived that the only route to a well-paid career is via a university degree. However, recent research by the Federation of Master Builders (FMB), which shows pay grades for manual jobs, proves that this isn’t necessarily the case.

Why it makes sense to get a trade versus going to university

The study shows the pay grades for both tradespeople and university graduates and reports that in general terms electricians and plumbers earn more than pharmacists, whilst roofers and bricklayers earn more than architects.

Research by the FMB also shows that construction apprentices will typically earn thousands of pounds more year-on-year than many of their university educated counterparts.

The research aims to prove that there are many career paths a school leaver can take without a degree and shatters the myth that apprenticeships have very little formal progression.

Money talks!

FMB’s chief executive Brian Berry said: “Money talks, and when it comes to annual salaries, a career in construction trumps many university graduate roles.

"The average university graduate earns £32,000 a year whereas your average brickie or roofer is earning £42,000 a year across the UK. Indeed, in London, a bricklayer is commanding wages of up to £90,000 a year."

"Pursuing a career in construction is therefore becoming an increasingly savvy move. University students graduate with an average £50,800 of debt, according to The Institute for Fiscal Studies, while apprentices pass the finish line completely debt-free.

"Not only that, apprentices earn while they learn, taking home around £17,000 a year. We are therefore calling on all parents, teachers and young people, who too often favour academic education, to give a career in construction serious consideration.”

Small building firms across the UK were asked what they paid their tradespeople and the average annual salaries were as follows:

Site managers - £51,266

Plumbers - £48,675

Supervisors - £48,407

Electricians - £47,265

Civil engineering operatives - £44,253

Steel fixers - £44,174

Roofers - £42,303

Bricklayers - £42,034

Carpenters and joiners - £41,413

Plasterers - £41,045

Scaffolders - £40,942

Floorers - £39,131

Plant operatives - £38,409

Painters and decorators - £34,587

General construction operatives - £32,392

The report also shows that university graduates were found to earn the following average annual salaries:

Pharmacists - £42,252

Dental practitioners - £40,268

Architects - £38,228

Teachers - £37,805

Chartered and certified accountants - £37,748

Midwives - £36,188

Veterinarians - £36,446

Physiotherapists - £32,065

Nurses - £31,867

Mr Berry added: “The construction industry is in the midst of an acute skills crisis and we are in dire need of more young people, including women and ethnic minorities, to join us.

"Our latest research shows that more than two-thirds of construction SMEs are struggling to hire bricklayers and 63 per cent are having problems hiring carpenters. This is a stark reminder of how the government's housing targets could be scuppered by a lack of skilled workers.

"The FMB is committed to working to improve the quality and quantity of apprenticeships because the only way we will build a sustainable skills base is by training more young people, and to a high standard.”

We’re pleased to see that this report shows that the average salary for electricians is higher than that reported by the ONS which is where the data for our 2018 Trades Salary Survey came from. This is only good news for anyone thinking of entering the industry and shows that it pays to enter the construction industry.

Of course, salary ranges will depend on a number of factors including, experience, qualifications, location and job responsibility etc and the starting salary for an entry level electrician will inevitably be lower.

If you are interested in an electrical training course, please visit our Course Finder page or speak to one of our course advisors on 01293 529777.

Source: www.irishnews.com

Categories: salary, pay, construction, graduates, university

Case Study - Libby Rush

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 27th March 2018

 

Name: Libby Rush

Course: Bronze + PAT

Libby is studying Engineering at university and decided to come to Trade Skills 4U to gain some more hands on experience. Here, she discusses how she found the course and why more women should enter the trade.

1. What is your reason for training?

I'm training as part of my graduate engineering scheme to improve my practical skills and become more familiar with building and wiring regulations.

2. Tell us why you decided to train as an electrican?

My employer has sent me to this course because at university I had very little hands on experience, since traditional education has a very heavy focus on science and design theory. This scheme puts that theory into the context of the real world and demonstrates the additional considerations needed to successfully design a circuit.

3. How long have you been working in the electrical industry?

I graduated from a 4 year university course in 2017 and have been in my role for 6 months.

4. Tell us about your current job? 

I am a graduate control, electrical and instrumentation engineer so my day to day includes a lot of computer based design. As part of the development programme I will be moving around different departments so I can learn more about how they work.

5. Why did you decide to take the Bronze course?

My employer has sent previous employees to Trade Skills 4U and received really positive feedback about the scheme so they've to incorporated it into the graduate development programme. 

6. Tell us about your experience with TS4U?

My experience at trade skills 4u has been absolutely fantastic, the support available for people like me with little knowledge in the subject was incredible. All the staff I've found to be really approachable as well as professional.

7. What did you enjoy most about the course?

The interactive way the courses were taught which allowed for back and forth of questions was a great way to build a rapport with the instructor and create a more comfortable learning environment. Teaching theory along side the practical elements also really helped me relate what we were doing in the workrooms to something I knew about.

8. What did you find most challenging about the course?

Jumping in day one into a pure practical exercise was challenging for me whilst other students were really in their element. It was the first time I got hand cramp outside of an exam, trying to keep up with everyone else.

9. Do you have any advice for women who are thinking of entering the trade?

I recommend finding a balance between powering through on your own and knowing when to ask for help. Working together and talking through problems is one of the best ways to learn and also break the ice, but don't be afraid to say no and that you want to do it by yourself. Ultimately, if someone else is over your shoulder and offering to tweak your work it won't benefit anyone in the long run.

10. Do you think there’s plenty of opportunities for those working in the electrical industry?

I've found a lot of opportunities within my area when I was looking for training schemes. It's such a vast industry there are so many levels to jump in on.

We wish Libby the best of luck with the rest of her training and new job!

Categories: case study, qualification, electrician, trade

18th Edition Wiring Regulations - Major Shift or Update?

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 13th March 2018

The new 18th Edition is due to be launched in July this year with changes coming into effect in January 2019. We’ve taken a look to see if there are any significant modifications to the 17th or if they are more like updates to be aware of.

Before we get into the nitty gritty of the regulations, there’s notable changes to the structure and layout of the book. Sparks used to have to navigate through the book by using a fragmented, sectioned based multiple contents guide, which most people didn’t find very user friendly. Now the book has a much larger contents section which has been formatted for a more holistic approach. This should now make it easier for electricians to navigate their way through the book to find the regulation they require.

We’ve taken a look through the regulations and highlighted what we think has changed in the new 18th Edition.   

Part 1

There’s only minor changes in part 1, these are slight amendments on information on electrical installation certificate.

Part 2

Chapter 41 – There are a number of significant changes taking place under this section. We’ve highlighted the two we think are most noteworthy.

• Regulation 411.3.3 has been revised and now applies to socket-outlets with a rated current not exceeding 32A. There is an exception to omit RCD protection where, other than a dwelling, a documented risk assessment determines that RCD protection is not necessary.

• A new Regulation 411.3.4 requires that, within domestic (household) premises, additional protection by an RCD with a rated residual operating current not exceeding 30 mA shall be provided for AC final circuits supplying luminaires.

Main changes include further use of RCD’s for domestic households. Including RCD protection for all lighting circuits and socket outlets rated up to 32A when previously 20A.

It’s important to note for domestic properties the regulation has been deleted that allows the use of RCD protection for a single socket outlet to be omitted as a permitted exception.

Chapter 42

Protection against thermal effects

•  A new Regulation 421.1.7 has been introduced recommending the installation of arc fault detection devices (AFDDs) to mitigate the risk of fire in AC final circuits of a fixed installation due to the effects of arc fault currents.

The main changes in this section includes the use of arc fault protection. These work by detecting a fault at a very early stage, reducing the magnitude of the perspective current whilst retaining the maximum permissible disconnection time for the circuit. This reduces the risk of fire for the duration of the fault and is now recommended for fixed electrical installations.

Chapter 44

Protection against voltage disturbances and electromagnetic disturbances

Section 443, which deals with protection against overvoltage’s of atmospheric origin or due to switching, has been redrafted.

The AQ criteria (conditions of external influence for lightning) for determining if protection against transient overvoltages is needed are no longer included in BS 7671. In its place, protection against transient overvoltages has to be provided where the consequence caused by overvoltage. In other instances, a risk assessment needs to be undertaken to decide if the protection is required.

These section mainly sees changes for the electrical design, commercial and industrial electricians. There are no major changes for general domestic installations.

Chapter 46

Devices for isolation and switching

A new chapter has been introduced which focuses on non-automatic local and remote isolation and switching measures for the prevention or removal of dangers associated with electrical installations or electrically powered equipment. Also, switching for the control of circuits or equipment. Where electrically powered equipment is within the scope of BS EN 60204, only the requirements of that standard apply.

Chapter 53

Protection, isolation, switching, control and monitoring

Chapter 52 has been adjusted to concentrate on requirements for protection, isolation, switching, control and monitoring dealing with requirements for selection and erection of devices provided to manage such functions.

Section 534

Devices for protection against overvoltage

This section has been revised with key changes to the selection of overvoltage protection devices.

Chapter 54

Earthing arrangements and protective conductors

This section has introduced two new regulations stating there’s a strong recommendation to install a foundation earth electrode on new buildings.

Chapter 55 

Other equipment

When installing luminaires in the ground, consideration must be given to the tables and standards highlighted in chapter 55.

• Ground-recessed luminaires, the selection and erection of which shall take account of the guidance given in Table A.1 of BS EN 60598-2-13.

Part 6

Inspection and testing

No major changes except for restructure of chapters.

Section 722 Electric vehicle charging installations

The main change in this section is to Regulation 722.411.4.1 which highlights the use of a PME supply with regards to vehicle charging installations. This means PME cannot be used unless you meet (i) (ii) (iii) of 722.411.4.1.

Part 8

Energy efficiency

The 18th Edition does see a whole new section which deals with Sustainability. This is mainly aimed at electrical design.

Overall there are some significant changes coming with the 18th Edition which will impact electricians on site. With the mains points consisting of: protecting against electric shock, protecting against electromagnetic disturbances and voltage disturbance and selection, erection of wiring systems and of course the introduction of energy efficiency.  So this is more than a small amendment or update, and as such electricians will need to update to the latest version of the 18th edition wiring regulations in the coming year. We already have lots of 18th edition course dates live to book online.

Categories: 18th edition

Case Study - Michael Williams

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 20th February 2018

 

Name: 

Michael Williams

Course: 

2365 Level 2 & 3

What was your job before training as an electrician and why did you choose the electrical trade?

Before, I ran my own powder coating company. I had grown tired of having unreliable staff and being forced to work excessive amounts of hours in order to meet unrealistic deadlines for demanding customers. I wanted to find a career where I could work on my own and be able to properly plan my workload.

I already had an interest in electronics from school and I've always been fascinated by cutting edge technologies. Adding all these elements together, training as an electrician seemed like the perfect solution.

Why did you take the 2365 Level 2 & 3?

It offered the most comprehensive training for someone wanting to enter into the electrical industry without going through the apprenticeship route.

What did you enjoy most about the course?

I really enjoyed learning all the theory and reasoning behind electrical installations. Knowing why things are done a certain way meant that I started to see the everyday world in a different light. We had a great tutor in Adam Ormesher, who really engaged with the whole class and kept the content interesting throughout.

What did you find most challenging?

Definitely the lighting circuits in the practical! There are so many different ways to wire them up that I often got a bit lost.

Can you tell us what you’re doing now?

I have started up on my own as an electrician. I am mostly sub-contracting to other, well established firms in order to build up my practical experience, but I do get the odd offer of my own work through friends and family.

What are your future plans to grow your business?

I have already returned to Trade Skills 4U and taken the PAT testing qualification. I will be back again for the inspection and testing course, the electric car charging point and the 18th edition course (when it is released). I want to arm myself with as much knowledge as possible so I am able to take on whatever work is offered to me.

What advice would you give to someone looking at training to become an electrician?

Work hard. Sometimes you may not grasp part of it straight away, but if you ask for help and stick with it, it will all make sense eventually. It is a really satisfying career choice, seeing a project through from beginning to end (no matter what it is) and having a pleased and grateful customer at the end of the day is a brilliant feeling.

Why did you choose TS4U?

Their training structure of 2 weeks on the course then the following 2 weeks back at home suited me perfectly. It allowed me to continue running my company as I trained ultimately leading to me selling it to move in to the electrical industry full time.

 

Thank you Michael for taking the time to tell us about your experience, we wish you luck in building your career as an electrician. 

Categories: case study, qualification, employment, electrician, trade

150,000 Construction Jobs To Be Created In The Next Five Years

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 8th February 2018

construction jobs on the rise

Despite the gloom around Carillion and Brexit, it is predicted that 150,000 jobs are set to be created in the construction sector over the next five years.

The Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) predicts that 15,350 carpenters and 9,350 labourers plus jobs for other trades will be needed as more homes are built.

The Federation of Master Builders reported that 48% of small and medium sized companies were also struggling to hire electricians and plumbers, with a further 46% finding it difficult to hire plasterers.

Chief executive of the Federation of Master Builders Brian Berry said: “Skills shortages are skyrocketing and it begs the question, who will build the new homes and infrastructure projects the government is crying out for?”

“The government has set itself an ambitious target to build 300,000 homes every year in England alone.”

“More than two-thirds of construction SMEs are struggling to hire bricklayers, which is one of the key trades in the building industry. This has increased by nearly 10% in just three months which points to a rapid worsening of an already dire situation.”

“What’s more, nearly as many are facing difficulties hiring carpenters and joiners. These figures are the highest we’ve noted since records began a decade ago.”

“As a result, the wages for these increasingly scarce skilled tradespeople continues to rise sharply; that’s a simple consequence of supply and demand.”

“On the domestic front and in the longer term, to ensure we have an ample supply of skilled workers in the future, the government must continue to work with industry to set the right framework in terms of T-Levels and apprenticeships.”

For the fourth year in a row employment is set to grow

Industry experts have forecast that output within the industry will also rise by 1.3% annually creating 158,000 jobs in the next five years. Infrastructure remains the strongest sector with an annual growth of 3.1%, with housing output also expected to grow.

However, it is also expected that commercial building will stagnate over the next five years, as investors are holding back due to the level of uncertainty with regards to England leaving the EU.

Despite this the CITB predict that for the fourth year in a row employment will grow by an average of 0.5% until 2022, which would equate to a massive 2.77 million people working in the construction industry, slightly below the peak reached in 2008.

The CITB Policy Director Steve Radley said: “Though growth is slightly down on 2017, it’s looking more balanced with housing and infrastructure both expanding significantly. And the range of job opportunities is growing. While we need to bring in lots of people in the trades, the fastest growth will be for professionals at 7.8 per cent and for managers and supervisors at 5.6 per cent.”

“By 2022, employment will be in touching distance of the heady 2008 peak so we face a massive recruitment and training challenge, which is likely to get harder after Brexit. So while we can take some comfort from weathering the recent storms, it’s vital that we make the investment in skills today that will shape our own destiny for tomorrow.”

Federation of Master Builders State of Trade Survey Q4  2017

Categories: jobs, electricians, construction