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18th Edition Video Questions Answered

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 13th November 2018

We recently published a video in partnership with Prysmian on Facebook. The video has had an immense response and there were a number of questions raised by viewers of varying levels of experience. So, we thought it a great idea to bring all of those questions together into one blog post.

If you want to know the key dates effecting you check out this blog post here.

1. When do the regulations come into effect?

From January 2019, this means electricians need to have gained the updated qualification by then.

2. What does it mean for RCD breakers and how do they work?

The RCD is broken into two devices with no overload protection, it also has a built in circuit breaker. An RCBO combines a circuit breaker characteristics with additional protection given by the residual current device (RCD), which in turn monitors the earth fault leakage. An RCD on its own will not offer overload protection.

3. Differences in Inspection & Testing?

Inspection is simply a visual assessment of the electrical installation, whereas testing involves using measuring equipment to verify it is safe to into a service.

4. How are the changes to the way the PFC is measured and the changes in the certificate?

Chapters 61, 62 and 63 have all been deleted and replaced by chapters 64 and 65. No major changes to our approach to inspection and testing except ring final circuit conductors now fall under the “continuity of conductors” regulation 643.2. Supply polarity 643.6 needs to verify before the system is energised. PFC 643.7.3.201 is still required at all relevant points of the installation and appendix 12 goes into further details of the requirements and features for domestic installations. Regarding the new model certificates in BS7671 a few new columns have been added to the schedules of test results such as a maximum circuit Zs value, insulation resistance test voltages applied and a column for AFDD for functions tests (if applicable). A few other details have changed in the EIC, EICR and the schedule of inspections. The biggest change has to be the minor works certificate where more information is now required.

5. Why are the regulations updated so often?

The regulations are updated so often due to innovation and new and emerging technologies. The UK is a member is of Cenelec, a European committee who set the standards for electro technology which we are legally obligated to abide by. The likelihood is, we will remain in this commission post Brexit. The BSI (British Standards Institution) and IET (Institution of Engineering and Technology) play a part in setting the new regulations. The IET collate new information and write the latest regulations and the BSI publish the documents.

6. When can we expect the 19th edition?

The likelihood is the first amendment will go ahead in approximately three years. Generally, looking at past editions a new edition will be published every 10 years.

7. Will the UK introduce flat twin and CPS with all conductors the same size and all insulated throughout their length?

The uninsulated CPS cable design developed and used in the UK for many years and we are unaware of any interest in changing it.

8. Are ‘YY type’ cables allowed for fixed installations?

In BS7671, it states all equipment we install should have a BS or BSEN specification standard. YY type cables have no specification, BS or EN so their use is discouraged. Technically this would be a departure from the BS7671 and must be recorded accordingly.

9. Are AFDD – Arc fault detection devices recommended?

In section 421.47 the Arc Fault is only recommended for providing additional safety against fire. However, it isn’t necessarily required for domestic properties but could be useful in the following types of premises:

- Any type of sleeping accommodation

- Fire propagating structures

- Properties such museums and art galleries with irreplaceable goods in

An AFDD will identify any Arc faults and they will isolate the circuit if any arc faults are detected to prevent fire.

10. SPD’s – what are they?

An SPD is a Search Protection Device. You have to install one of these devices when conducting an installation.  If you don’t, as a qualified electrician you have to provide a risk assessment as to why you don’t need to do this. An SPD detects current surges within an electrical system, these surges are monitored/picked up by SPD’s to protect the electrical installation. This is installed to reduce the risk of fire and protecting equipment.

11. What are fire resistant fixings?

These are generally steel or copper cable supports fixed directly to the structure of the building so that in the event of a fire cables remain in place for as long as possible. Before this clause cables were fixed with plastic which would not resist the fire and fallen cables would become a hazard to fire fighters. Four fire fighters died in two separate incidents as a result of their entanglement in the prematurely collapsed cables.

 

If you would like to watch the video head over to the Trade Skills 4U Facebook page: 

Also, if you would like to book onto an 18th Edition course we have a range of courses happening throughout the country as well as weekend courses. For more information click here:

Categories: electrical, training, electrician, 18th edition

2019 Trades Salary Survey: Electrician Salary increases by 5%

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 8th November 2018

Electricians Salaries remain the highest of all trades

Each year we compile a blog post reporting on average salaries based on the data released from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) for those working in the construction industry.

Last year we reported that the average UK salary for an electrician was £30,784. This year, for another year running, it’s been a great period for Sparkies, who not only continue to earn the most of the trades but also see the biggest increase of all at 5%.

Average Electrician Salary (£32,315)

According to the Office of National Statistics the average salary for an electrician in the last year has risen by 5% to £32,315. This is the highest increase seen in the trades with plumbers following at 3.9%.

Average Salaries by Trade

The data below is based on the 2015 and 2018 Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings taken from the Office of National Statistics.

To check out what the average percentage increase has been over the last 12 months please click on the interactive chart below. You will see that most of the trades have seen some impressive increases in pay with electricians still earning the most, and are now earning around £1,260 more than plumbers.

Trades Salary Survey

The figures shown are based on the median value meaning that half will earn more and half will earn less. This is the Office of National Statistics preferred measure of average earnings and is less affected by a relatively small number of very high earners that can skew the data upward. The median average gives a better indication of typical salaries than the mean which shows salaries at £32,627.

How do electricians charge for their time?

When working in someone’s home most electricians will charge a day rate or a fixed rate depending on the job. Electricians who are employed and earn a salary are in the minority with the majority working on a self employed basis.

As a guide you could expect to charge the following for:

Consumer Unit replacement £350 – £500 (0.5 – 1 day)

Perform an Electrical Inspection report £90 – £180 (4 – 8 hours)

Install and supply a double socket £90 – £125 (1 – 3 hours)

Replace a light fitting £40 – £60 (0.5 – 1 hour)

Repair a damaged power cable £40 – £50 (0.5 – 1 hour)

Electric shower installation £250 – £400 (0.5 – 1 day)

Install an external security light £90 – £140 (1 – 3 hours)

Hourly Rates / Day Rates (£40-£60 Per Hour / £180-£350 Per Day)

Because there are no statistics available on a national level it is quite hard to obtain accurate data regarding how much is actually charged. Also, because most electricians will charge either an hourly rate, day rate or a fixed rate depending on the type of job, their earnings will fluctuate from year to year. Rates can also vary drastically depending on location and experience. However, an experienced electrician working in the South East on average charges £45 per hour or £350 per day.

As you would expect, a self-employed electrician will tend to earn more than someone who is employed. However, you should take into account that there are other costs to consider such as the cost of buying tools, vehicle expenses, business insurance and registration on a competent persons scheme.

As mentioned the average annual salary for electricians is approx. £32K per year, however research suggests that this figure is actually more likely to be around £35-40K and can be higher still for those working in the South East.

What are trainee electrician salaries like? (Around £23K)

Whilst many electricians will start out as an apprentice earning below the minimum wage, they do benefit from being able to gain a qualification whilst earning a wage. The current national minimum wage for an apprentice in their first year is £3.70 per hour, however many employers prefer to pay more with the average salary being approx. £170 per week.

However, there are other options available, and we find that a lot of our customers prefer to front load their training and complete technical certificates first (C&G 2365 Level 2 & 3). This enables students to command a higher starting salary of between £21-25,000 per year when they start working as an electrician’s mate.

JIB Electrician Wage Grades

The JIB publish guidelines to what electricians can earn on their website, however, be aware that not all employers will adhere to these guidelines.

From and including Monday 7th January 2018 the JIB suggests that the national standard rates if you have your own transport are:

Trainee Electrician - £12.08

Electrician - £15.05

Approved Electrician - £16.32

Site Technician - £18.37

And for those who work in London or the south east you should expect:

Trainee Electrician - £13.53

Electrician - £16.86

Approved Electrician - £18.28

Site Technician - £20.57

Experience and obtaining further qualifications can help towards achieving higher pay grades:

1. Trainee Electrician – apprenticeship or electricians mate usually with C&G 2365 Diplomas

2. Electrician – relevant qualifications, Level 3 NVQ & AM2 (C&G 2357)

3. Approved Electrician – as per number 2 plus periodic inspection and testing qualification such as the C&G 2391-52

4. Site Technician – As per number 3 plus over 5 years’ experience (3 of which in a supervisory role) plus a level 4 qualification such as a HNC

Ways to earn more

The salary ranges reported in this article are only intended as a guideline. Depending on your experience, how many hours you are prepared to put in and how hard you are prepared to work we believe that there is really no limit to what you could potentially earn.

We still believe that becoming an electrician remains a great career choice especially as the demands from the growing housing sector continue to rise. There are also issues around the number of older electricians wanting to retire, which will inevitably lead to further shortfalls in labour required to meet demand.

There are many ways to increase your earning potential, and this really comes down to how much hard work you are willing to put in.

1. Agency work – for those starting out working for an agency is a good option. Here you will be able to gain the confidence and experience needed to go out to apply for contracts direct.

2. Overtime – For those employed working on a job where deadlines need to be met then overtime is a great way to increase your earnings as this is often paid at a higher hourly rate.

3. Up-skilling – to improve your skills set as an electrician, further training is a great way increase your earning potential.

4. Self employed – for the more experienced electrician who wishes to work for themselves and apply directly for their own contracts, setting up in business provides the opportunity to increase earnings further.

To help you achieve better pay or a higher grade you might want to consider undertaking the following courses:

C&G 2396 Electrical Design course – for Site Technician status

C&G 2391-52 Inspection & Testing Course – for Approved Electrician status

The bottom line is, if you are prepared to work hard, invest in yourself and ensure your work is carried out to a high standard your income as well as your reputation will increase significantly.

 

Categories: salary, pay

Halloween Hall of Horrors

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 26th October 2018

Whether you are preparing for a spookfest with friends or getting ready for the trick-or-treaters, let’s think about all the electrical horrors we come across day to day at work.

Sparks who squeeze themselves into small dark loft spaces with hidden spiders or have to work in creepy basements come across some sights. There’s also the real danger of working with faulty electrics, exposed wires and installations placed where they shouldn’t be.

With the scare season officially upon us, we take a look at some truly shocking electrical installations.

 

Imagine getting tangled in this mess!

 

Would you want to touch this to try and fix it? 

 

Can you spot what's wrong in this picture?

 

This is truly shocking!! Who on earth left this panel like this?

 

This looks like something straight out of horror movie. Would you follow what this note says?!

 

What a mess this looks like to work with! Where would you start!

 

Correct IP rating? You tell us!

 

Could you try out this balancing act?

 

Can you sense the tension in the room??

 

What a tangled mess! We wouldn't want this to sort through on a Friday!

The above electrical horrors emphasise how important it is to always employ a qualified electrician to do the job properly! 

Make sure your electrics are always safe. If you have any concerns about electrics in your home or workplace, you can ask an electrician to carry out an EICR (electrical installation condition report).

Happy Halloween everyone, we hope you enjoyed looking through the scary pictures!!!!

Categories: halloween, shocks, spooks, horror

Ocean Changes – Let’s make waves!

Posted by Christos Panayiotou on 24th October 2018

Ocean Changes

Ocean Changes are a non-profit organisation that began at the end of 2017. Its founder Rachel Yardley was inspired after watching David Attenborough’s Blue Planet II, and like many others she was shocked and saddened at the extent of damage mankind’s influence had on the world's oceans, through both global pollution and climate change.

Ocean Changes have since been carrying out regular beach cleans and work to raise awareness and to help make an impact on the effect our throwaway lifestyles are having on our seas and marine life. Their first beach clean in January 2018, at Goring-by-sea, attracted 250 motivated volunteers to help clean up their local beach thanks to the impact of Blue Planet II. Ocean Changes use their beach cleans as an opportunity to have fun, make an impact, socialise and spread the word.

On hearing about the fantastic work the charity is doing, Executive Chairman, Carl Bennett decided he’d like to somehow get involved and as such can announce that Trade Skills 4U is now a proud sponsor.

Ocean Changes has been proudly supported by hundreds of local like-minded people, who have come together to unite in their efforts in making a positive change for not only our planet but our oceans and marine life for the future benefit of generations to come.

They boast a small team of passionate members that volunteer their time to help co-ordinate their efforts towards beach cleaning, media sharing and future ambitions of education and changing old habits. They stand for ‘doing’ something about the global manmade issues we are currently facing with ocean pollution and its detrimental effects that we see and witness over and over again.

A message from Ocean Changes as to why we should care

Our oceans dominate our earth’s natural systems, they control the climate and the carbon cycle, produce half of all of the oxygen we breath and support an astounding diversity of life.

Plastics adversely affect terrestrial and marine ecosystems

Nearly 700 marine species have been reported to either ingest and/or become entangled in plastic. This includes almost 50% of all sea birds, sea snakes, sea turtles, penguins, seals, sea lions, manatees, sea otters, fish and crustaceans. The effects can be fatal but may also have other lethal consequences compromising their ability to catch and digest food, escape from predators, maintain body condition and migrate.

Plastic contains chemicals that when eaten leach out and disrupt normal hormonal function. Micro plastics also absorb a wide array of organic and inorganic pollutants from the surrounding environments.

Ingestion of micro plastics from plankton, at the bottom of the food chain is magnified in organisms higher up the food chain (including us) where toxins accumulate, and concentration is increased.

The choices we make today can change the planet of tomorrow; it takes all of us to change the future for the better.

Ocean Changes can’t make such a positive change without our great volunteers and sponsors. You can find out more about us and get involved in our beach cleans by following us on Facebook -@oceanchanges.

We may be a small drop in the ocean, but if we make a big enough splash, we can make waves… let’s make waves!

Categories: beach cleans, beach clean ups

18th Edition Key Dates for Your Diary

Posted by Christos Panayiotou on 16th October 2018

As the UK’s leading electrical training provider we are constantly being asked by customers for information on deadlines for the 18th edition changes. So we thought we would make write a quick blog post highlighting the key dates that you really need to know so that you don’t get caught out.

1st July 2018.

The first date is one you should be aware of. The 18th Edition was released on the 1st July 2018. As such if you are wanting to do a wiring regs course then from this date you need to make sure you are taking the 18th, not the 17th edition.

1st January 2019

The second date is an important one. From this date all installations that are designed must comply with the 18th edition. So from this date even if you are not qualified to the 18th edition you must still have an understanding of the changes and design in accordance with them. Also if you are assessed by your scheme provider they will have to assess you against the 18th edition.

Your next assessment date

The next date is one only you will know. From the 1st of January 2019 it is likely that you will need to hold the 18th edition qualification by the date of your next assessment. There may be some flexibility from scheme providers some of which have suggested a grace period of 6 to 12 months.

1st July 2019

This is the date we expect most scheme provider to no longer apply a grace period. As such we would say this is the final date from which you should aim to have passed your 18th edition. However you may not want to wait too long as there could be a late rush making course places with reputable providers harder to find.

If in doubt the best thing to do is speak with your scheme provider. What is clear is that from January 2019 you really need to be up to speed. You will be assessed against the 18th edition so this is really a crucial date. Remember if you have taken your 17th edition since the 1st January 2015 you can take a quick update course to gain the qualification. The common sense approach is to gain the qualification sooner than later. 

To see all our 18th edition course options visit this page.

 

Categories: 18th edition

Case Study - Dan Wainwright

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 16th October 2018

 

1. What did you do before you trained to become an electrician?

I was a self-employed industrial door engineer, working many hours a day. It wasn’t an exciting job and the day to day duties became too repetitive.

2. Why did you decide to take the 2365?

I chose to train as an electrician because I wanted to challenge myself and gain a nationally recognised qualification. From the research I did about the Level 2 & 3 2365, I knew it would be the best way for me train and learn in-depth knowledge of electrical systems within the right timeframe.

3. Have you taken any additional courses with TS4U? If so, which ones and why?

Yes, I have taken the 2919-01 EV charging course. I wanted to add this additional qualification on because I think EV charging is a rapidly growing industry which I want to be a part of.

4. What was your overall experience with TS4U?

I really enjoyed my time at the Warrington centre. The staff and tutors were excellent and professional from start to finish. Also, because you are studying with the same group people for a long length of time, you make some great friends who all help each out and see one another succeed.

5. What did you enjoy from the course?

That there was always something new to learn. I felt every day was different, and I was so impressed by the amount of knowledge passed on from the tutors. The practical sessions were always the best for me.

6. Did you struggle with any parts of the course?

Yes, I felt I struggled the most with the maths & science topics. However, the tutors are extremely helpful and they make sure you have a full understanding of the theory side of the course.

7. Have you managed to get any on site experience whilst studying? If so, what is this?

Yes, I’ve been wiring industrial doors on site. I feel I have become more confident as the course has gone on and feel more skilled to work on other projects now too.

8. Have you managed to find employment since training with TS4U?

I managed to find employment towards the end of my course. Through my new qualifications I have been offered and job with Chargemaster plc.

9. Where do you hope your qualifications will take you?

With the knowledge gained, I hope my new employer will make me a specialist in my choice of field.

10. What advice would you give to someone who is thinking of want to become an electrician?

Don't ponder it, just do it! The qualifications can take you through any route including domestic, commercial, EV and electrical design. Retraining as an electrician has been one of the best experiences I have had and I would highly recommend it to anyone. 

Categories: qualified, electrician, electric vehicle, career

The Professional and Career Development Loan scheme is closing

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 27th September 2018

career development loan

If you are considering applying for a Professional and Career Development Loan (PCDL), you need to be aware that as from the 25th January 2019 this loan will no longer be available to new borrowers. Existing loans will not be affected.

What is a Professional and Career Development Loan?

The Professional and Career Development Loan is different from a personal loan in that that you don't pay any interest on the loan while you're studying, as this is paid for by the Government instead.

The loan is specifically designed to pay for courses and training that improve your employability or, if you already have a job, improve your career prospects. The loan can be used to pay for either some or all of your course costs, including books.

Who can apply?

You can apply if you are 18 years or over, a British citizen, have been living in the UK for at least 3 years before your course starts or you plan to work in the UK, European Union (EU) or European Economic Area (EEA) after the course.

How does the loan work?

You can apply to borrow between £300 and £10,000 to help fund your course. Once accepted, the Government will pay the interest on the loan for the duration of your course and for one month after it has finished.

This allows you to complete your course and only start repaying your loan after your course has finished. It will then be up to you to start repaying the loan, plus the interest stated in your loan agreement in fixed monthly payments which you can spread over 1 to 5 years. If you drop out of the course you are still be liable to pay the full amount.

The Professional and Career Development Loan is offered by the Co-op Bank. Below you can see a representative example but for more details on interest rates and eligibility please visit the Co-op bank website.

loan example

To qualify for the PCDL you need make sure that you apply 8 weeks before your course starts, this will give your bank enough time to process your application. If you apply more than 8 weeks ahead your application will not be accepted. The final date for submitted applications is Friday, 25 January 2019, with a course start date no later than 24 March 2019.

What can I use the loan for and how do I apply?

You can apply to use the Professional Career Development Loan to pay for the C&G 2365 Diploma Course Package us. Please be aware that we have limited spaces on each course, so please ensure you contact us on 0800 856 4448 or 03330 123 123 to discuss if we have loans available on your chosen start date.

We would advise reviewing all the information on the Government Website before making your application.

It is your responsibility to fully research whether the loan is the right choice for you before deciding to make an application. If you do take out a loan it is your responsibility to make the payments for this loan once the course is finished as you would if taking out any kind of private finance.

Alternatively to find out whether a PDCL is the best option for you please call the National Careers Service on 0800 100 900.

Categories: professional and career development loan

How often should you calibrate your test equipment?

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 18th September 2018

To ensure that your electrical testing equipment and test meters provide you with accurate results in accordance with its specifications it is recommended that you have these calibrated on regular basis.

A frequently asked question is “How often should I calibrate my test equipment” and the short answer is that unfortunately there is no short answer! There isn’t a ‘one size fits all’ as every instrument will have a different calibration frequency requirement as recommended by the manufacture.

Therefore, to give peace of mind and to ensure that you can use your equipment safely and reliably, it is advised that you follow the manufacturers recommended frequency. However, you should also bear in mind that critical measurements may require different intervals.

How important is Calibration

The calibration process compares a measuring instrument with a measurement standard to establish the relationship between the values indicated by the instrument and those of the standard.

The accuracy of your test instruments can drop over time, therefore it is advisable that regular calibration is undertaken. The accuracy of major components of instruments like voltage references, input dividers and current shunts will start to shift over time. However, this shift is minor and won’t affect the measurements if you maintain a good calibration schedule.

The calibration of your test instruments must be undertaken by an accredited laboratory. All meter calibrations must be traceable back to the National Standards and procedures detailed in BS EN/IEC17025:2017 and carried out by suppliers who are ISO 9001:2015 certified. The organisation you use should be AKAS accredited. If they are not, the following risks could include compliance and safety issues, litigation issues, wastage of resources and materials, increased downtimes, low quality of the final products.

It is also worth noting that by keeping your own record of measurements, you will be satisfying guidelines from bodies such as the NICEIC, ELECSA and NAPIT who will carry out your annual assessment.

If you do this using a known fixed resistor bank, for example, record the results at the frequency and manner specified by the bodies and the readings remain the same, this may satisfy the need for calibration.

Listed below are some calibration frequencies, which we hope you will find helpful:

Manufacturers’ recommendation - You should keep up with the manufacturers’ recommend frequency, however you should also note that critical measurements may require different intervals.

Before you start a major critical measuring project - If you have a project that requires highly accurate measurements, firstly decide which instruments you will use and then send them for calibration, then lock them down in storage until testing begins to ensure you get absolutely accurate results.

After a major critical measuring project ends - After a major critical measuring project you should send the same equipment for calibration. When you get the results back you can confirm the accuracy of your testing results for that project.

After an accident/event - You may need to consider having the instrument checked for accuracy following a hit, eg if something knocked out the internal overload or they had physical impact.

Per project requirements - Each job regardless of the project size will have a different calibration requirement. Some will require certified and calibrated test equipment, where others may not require stringent calibration standards. These requirements may not be explicitly stated, therefor you should review the specs before the test.

Monthly, quarterly, or semi-annually - If you do critical measurements often then a shorter time span between calibrations will mean there is less chance of questionable test results. Often calibrating at shorter intervals will afford you with better specifications. Depending on their usage, you may have to calibrate equipment on a monthly, quarterly or semiannually basis. One way of achieving this is to use a circuit with known readings, a proprietary calibration card or check box.

Annually - If you carry out a mix of critical and non-critical measurements, annual calibration tends to be a good option with the right balance between prudence and cost.

Biannually - If you don’t carry out many critical measurements and don’t expose your meter to an event, calibration at long frequencies can be more cost-effective.

And finally… Your business insurance may require you to have a valid calibration certificate, as well as an awarding organisation, therefore it’s advisable to check with them.

You may also be interested to read our blog What is Meter Calibration and Why is it Important? and view the results from a survey we ran in 2017 Survey Results: How often should you have your test meter calibrated? 

If you are interested in taking a course with us and would like to speak to a Course Advisor please contact 0800 856 4448, alternatively for more information please visit our Course Finder page. 

Categories: calibration frequency, calibrate, testing equipment, test meters

Trade Skills 4U Group Launches New Electrical Training For Business Division

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 14th August 2018

trade skills business

We are proud to announce the launch of a new corporate division, Trade Skills Business, offering electrical training programmes for business.

This new division will focus on delivering quality practical and theoretical electrical training solutions to commercial businesses wanting a more bespoke service tailored to their individual needs.

Training schedules structured to your business needs

We have seen a growing demand for training courses nationwide especially since the introduction of the C&G 2382-18 18th Edition Wiring Regulations. As the electrical industry continues to grow we feel it is more important than ever the correct electrical training is given to employees of larger companies as well as the sole traders. With this in mind we will be talking to local and national businesses across the country with a view to gaining an understanding of their requirements to enable us to create training schedules specifically structured to their business needs.

Carl Bennett Executive Chairman said “We are celebrating a year of growth and expansion and we understand the importance of maintaining and delivering quality training to our customers paving the way for our continued future growth.

“We believe we are the perfect business partner to offer bespoke electrical training not only for our existing customers who we have built productive relationships with over the years, but also to new customers who are looking to work with a partner to deliver real business benefits. We are also proud to be one of the UK’s first training companies to achieve the IET Centres of Excellence.”

Courses delivered nationwide

The Group consistently deliver a huge range of electrical courses and a wide variety of specialist skills that won’t be found anywhere else in the UK. Courses can be delivered at our state-of-the-art facilities nationwide, or onsite almost anywhere in the UK and can vary in duration and intensity from one day courses to extended periods up to sixteen weeks. Courses offered include C&G 2382-18 18th Edition, C&G 2391 Inspection & Testing, C&G 2365 Diploma Level 2 & 3, C&G 2377 PAT Testing, C&G 2396 Electrical Design, C&G 2919 EV Car Charging Point Installers courses, Emergency Lighting, Fire Alarms Training, BPEC Solar PV and many more.

We are here to help

When it comes to electrical training we understand that no two businesses are the same and therefore will have different training requirements. Our dedicated training supervisors are on hand to work with and identify the needs of our customers and programmes offered can be completely bespoke, or an amalgamation of existing qualifications to provide the right mix of certification to meet our customer's needs.

If you would like to speak to a training supervisor please contact 0800 856 4448, or for more information please visit Trade Skills Business.

 

Categories: bespoke electrical training, training centres, trade skills business

Send me over the edge!

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 7th August 2018

charity abseil

This September our very own Liliane Branca, Tutor at Trade Skills 4U Gatwick facility, will be ‘stepping over the edge’ in a charity abseil to raise funds for Chestnut Tree House, the children’s hospice for Sussex and South East Hampshire, helping life-limited children and their families.

Liliane said “I am taking part in the Arundel Castle Abseil on Saturday 29th September for Chestnut Tree House when I'll be abseiling 180 feet down the Bake House Tower in the grounds of Arundel Castle, and as far as I know I'm not afraid of heights...”

“This is my first charity fundraising event and I’m hoping to raise enough funds to help pay towards the care costs of the Chestnut Tree House’s care services, who offer incredible support to those that need it most.

“I have chosen to support this worthy charity due to my own personal experience when I sadly lost my Godson Matthew due to heart problems at the very young age of 22 months. I am therefore, very much aware of the impact a child with a life-limiting illness can have on family members and also close family friends.

“The Chestnut Tree House is such a worthy charity that helps support the families of children affected, not only during their illness but also for the years following.”

Care services at Chestnut Tree House

Chestnut Tree House children’s hospice cares for around 300 children all of whom are unlikely to reach adulthood. The Community Nursing Team visit families at home, taking children out to explore their local community or simply giving tired families and carers the chance to take a well-earned break.

Children and families can also visit Chestnut Tree House’s beautiful hospice near Arundel where kids can be astronauts for the day in the multi-sensory room, or discover creepy crawlies on a woodland walk where parents can just be parents and not carers, and where siblings have people to talk to who understand.

Then, when the time comes, Chestnut Tree helps children and families say goodbye in whatever way feels right for them, either at home or in the hospice itself. They offer ongoing bereavement support for the whole family.

Whilst the hospice itself is near Arundel, Chestnut Tree has had a physical presence in Eastbourne for many years, initially working from a Co-Hub in the town centre before taking on their own offices and finally moving to Pacific House in February 2016. The office provides a base for the East Sussex care team and for a small fundraising team who focus solely on raising funds and awareness in East Sussex.

It costs over £3.9 million every year to provide Chestnut Tree House’s specialist care services and less than 6% of that comes from central Government. All care is offered to families free of charge, so the charity relies heavily on the support of the local community.

Everyone at Trade Skills 4U wishes Liliane well in her daredevil abseil, and we look forward to sharing some great action shots with you after the event!.

If you would like to find out more about what they charity is about, or to sponsor Liliane please visit her JustGiving page. 

Categories: charity, abseil, arundel castle