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18th Edition Key Dates for Your Diary

Posted by Christos Panayiotou on 16th October 2018

As the UK’s leading electrical training provider we are constantly being asked by customers for information on deadlines for the 18th edition changes. So we thought we would make write a quick blog post highlighting the key dates that you really need to know so that you don’t get caught out.

1st July 2018.

The first date is one you should be aware of. The 18th Edition was released on the 1st July 2018. As such if you are wanting to do a wiring regs course then from this date you need to make sure you are taking the 18th, not the 17th edition.

1st January 2019

The second date is an important one. From this date all installations that are designed must comply with the 18th edition. So from this date even if you are not qualified to the 18th edition you must still have an understanding of the changes and design in accordance with them. Also if you are assessed by your scheme provider they will have to assess you against the 18th edition.

Your next assessment date

The next date is one only you will know. From the 1st of January 2019 it is likely that you will need to hold the 18th edition qualification by the date of your next assessment. There may be some flexibility from scheme providers some of which have suggested a grace period of 6 to 12 months.

1st July 2019

This is the date we expect most scheme provider to no longer apply a grace period. As such we would say this is the final date from which you should aim to have passed your 18th edition. However you may not want to wait too long as there could be a late rush making course places with reputable providers harder to find.

If in doubt the best thing to do is speak with your scheme provider. What is clear is that from January 2019 you really need to be up to speed. You will be assessed against the 18th edition so this is really a crucial date. Remember if you have taken your 17th edition since the 1st January 2015 you can take a quick update course to gain the qualification. The common sense approach is to gain the qualification sooner than later. 

To see all our 18th edition course options visit this page.

 

Categories: 18th edition

Case Study - Dan Wainwright

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 16th October 2018

 

1. What did you do before you trained to become an electrician?

I was a self-employed industrial door engineer, working many hours a day. It wasn’t an exciting job and the day to day duties became too repetitive.

2. Why did you decide to take the 2365?

I chose to train as an electrician because I wanted to challenge myself and gain a nationally recognised qualification. From the research I did about the Level 2 & 3 2365, I knew it would be the best way for me train and learn in-depth knowledge of electrical systems within the right timeframe.

3. Have you taken any additional courses with TS4U? If so, which ones and why?

Yes, I have taken the 2919-01 EV charging course. I wanted to add this additional qualification on because I think EV charging is a rapidly growing industry which I want to be a part of.

4. What was your overall experience with TS4U?

I really enjoyed my time at the Warrington centre. The staff and tutors were excellent and professional from start to finish. Also, because you are studying with the same group people for a long length of time, you make some great friends who all help each out and see one another succeed.

5. What did you enjoy from the course?

That there was always something new to learn. I felt every day was different, and I was so impressed by the amount of knowledge passed on from the tutors. The practical sessions were always the best for me.

6. Did you struggle with any parts of the course?

Yes, I felt I struggled the most with the maths & science topics. However, the tutors are extremely helpful and they make sure you have a full understanding of the theory side of the course.

7. Have you managed to get any on site experience whilst studying? If so, what is this?

Yes, I’ve been wiring industrial doors on site. I feel I have become more confident as the course has gone on and feel more skilled to work on other projects now too.

8. Have you managed to find employment since training with TS4U?

I managed to find employment towards the end of my course. Through my new qualifications I have been offered and job with Chargemaster plc.

9. Where do you hope your qualifications will take you?

With the knowledge gained, I hope my new employer will make me a specialist in my choice of field.

10. What advice would you give to someone who is thinking of want to become an electrician?

Don't ponder it, just do it! The qualifications can take you through any route including domestic, commercial, EV and electrical design. Retraining as an electrician has been one of the best experiences I have had and I would highly recommend it to anyone. 

Categories: qualified, electrician, electric vehicle, career

The Professional and Career Development Loan scheme is closing

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 27th September 2018

career development loan

If you are considering applying for a Professional and Career Development Loan (PCDL), you need to be aware that as from the 25th January 2019 this loan will no longer be available to new borrowers. Existing loans will not be affected.

What is a Professional and Career Development Loan?

The Professional and Career Development Loan is different from a personal loan in that that you don't pay any interest on the loan while you're studying, as this is paid for by the Government instead.

The loan is specifically designed to pay for courses and training that improve your employability or, if you already have a job, improve your career prospects. The loan can be used to pay for either some or all of your course costs, including books.

Who can apply?

You can apply if you are 18 years or over, a British citizen, have been living in the UK for at least 3 years before your course starts or you plan to work in the UK, European Union (EU) or European Economic Area (EEA) after the course.

How does the loan work?

You can apply to borrow between £300 and £10,000 to help fund your course. Once accepted, the Government will pay the interest on the loan for the duration of your course and for one month after it has finished.

This allows you to complete your course and only start repaying your loan after your course has finished. It will then be up to you to start repaying the loan, plus the interest stated in your loan agreement in fixed monthly payments which you can spread over 1 to 5 years. If you drop out of the course you are still be liable to pay the full amount.

The Professional and Career Development Loan is offered by the Co-op Bank. Below you can see a representative example but for more details on interest rates and eligibility please visit the Co-op bank website.

loan example

To qualify for the PCDL you need make sure that you apply 8 weeks before your course starts, this will give your bank enough time to process your application. If you apply more than 8 weeks ahead your application will not be accepted. The final date for submitted applications is Friday, 25 January 2019, with a course start date no later than 24 March 2019.

What can I use the loan for and how do I apply?

You can apply to use the Professional Career Development Loan to pay for the C&G 2365 Diploma Course Package us. Please be aware that we have limited spaces on each course, so please ensure you contact us on 0800 856 4448 or 03330 123 123 to discuss if we have loans available on your chosen start date.

We would advise reviewing all the information on the Government Website before making your application.

It is your responsibility to fully research whether the loan is the right choice for you before deciding to make an application. If you do take out a loan it is your responsibility to make the payments for this loan once the course is finished as you would if taking out any kind of private finance.

Alternatively to find out whether a PDCL is the best option for you please call the National Careers Service on 0800 100 900.

Categories: professional and career development loan

How often should you calibrate your test equipment?

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 18th September 2018

To ensure that your electrical testing equipment and test meters provide you with accurate results in accordance with its specifications it is recommended that you have these calibrated on regular basis.

A frequently asked question is “How often should I calibrate my test equipment” and the short answer is that unfortunately there is no short answer! There isn’t a ‘one size fits all’ as every instrument will have a different calibration frequency requirement as recommended by the manufacture.

Therefore, to give peace of mind and to ensure that you can use your equipment safely and reliably, it is advised that you follow the manufacturers recommended frequency. However, you should also bear in mind that critical measurements may require different intervals.

How important is Calibration

The calibration process compares a measuring instrument with a measurement standard to establish the relationship between the values indicated by the instrument and those of the standard.

The accuracy of your test instruments can drop over time, therefore it is advisable that regular calibration is undertaken. The accuracy of major components of instruments like voltage references, input dividers and current shunts will start to shift over time. However, this shift is minor and won’t affect the measurements if you maintain a good calibration schedule.

The calibration of your test instruments must be undertaken by an accredited laboratory. All meter calibrations must be traceable back to the National Standards and procedures detailed in BS EN/IEC17025:2017 and carried out by suppliers who are ISO 9001:2015 certified. The organisation you use should be AKAS accredited. If they are not, the following risks could include compliance and safety issues, litigation issues, wastage of resources and materials, increased downtimes, low quality of the final products.

It is also worth noting that by keeping your own record of measurements, you will be satisfying guidelines from bodies such as the NICEIC, ELECSA and NAPIT who will carry out your annual assessment.

If you do this using a known fixed resistor bank, for example, record the results at the frequency and manner specified by the bodies and the readings remain the same, this may satisfy the need for calibration.

Listed below are some calibration frequencies, which we hope you will find helpful:

Manufacturers’ recommendation - You should keep up with the manufacturers’ recommend frequency, however you should also note that critical measurements may require different intervals.

Before you start a major critical measuring project - If you have a project that requires highly accurate measurements, firstly decide which instruments you will use and then send them for calibration, then lock them down in storage until testing begins to ensure you get absolutely accurate results.

After a major critical measuring project ends - After a major critical measuring project you should send the same equipment for calibration. When you get the results back you can confirm the accuracy of your testing results for that project.

After an accident/event - You may need to consider having the instrument checked for accuracy following a hit, eg if something knocked out the internal overload or they had physical impact.

Per project requirements - Each job regardless of the project size will have a different calibration requirement. Some will require certified and calibrated test equipment, where others may not require stringent calibration standards. These requirements may not be explicitly stated, therefor you should review the specs before the test.

Monthly, quarterly, or semi-annually - If you do critical measurements often then a shorter time span between calibrations will mean there is less chance of questionable test results. Often calibrating at shorter intervals will afford you with better specifications. Depending on their usage, you may have to calibrate equipment on a monthly, quarterly or semiannually basis. One way of achieving this is to use a circuit with known readings, a proprietary calibration card or check box.

Annually - If you carry out a mix of critical and non-critical measurements, annual calibration tends to be a good option with the right balance between prudence and cost.

Biannually - If you don’t carry out many critical measurements and don’t expose your meter to an event, calibration at long frequencies can be more cost-effective.

And finally… Your business insurance may require you to have a valid calibration certificate, as well as an awarding organisation, therefore it’s advisable to check with them.

You may also be interested to read our blog What is Meter Calibration and Why is it Important? and view the results from a survey we ran in 2017 Survey Results: How often should you have your test meter calibrated? 

If you are interested in taking a course with us and would like to speak to a Course Advisor please contact 0800 856 4448, alternatively for more information please visit our Course Finder page. 

Categories: calibration frequency, calibrate, testing equipment, test meters

Trade Skills 4U Group Launches New Electrical Training For Business Division

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 14th August 2018

trade skills business

We are proud to announce the launch of a new corporate division, Trade Skills Business, offering electrical training programmes for business.

This new division will focus on delivering quality practical and theoretical electrical training solutions to commercial businesses wanting a more bespoke service tailored to their individual needs.

Training schedules structured to your business needs

We have seen a growing demand for training courses nationwide especially since the introduction of the C&G 2382-18 18th Edition Wiring Regulations. As the electrical industry continues to grow we feel it is more important than ever the correct electrical training is given to employees of larger companies as well as the sole traders. With this in mind we will be talking to local and national businesses across the country with a view to gaining an understanding of their requirements to enable us to create training schedules specifically structured to their business needs.

Carl Bennett Executive Chairman said “We are celebrating a year of growth and expansion and we understand the importance of maintaining and delivering quality training to our customers paving the way for our continued future growth.

“We believe we are the perfect business partner to offer bespoke electrical training not only for our existing customers who we have built productive relationships with over the years, but also to new customers who are looking to work with a partner to deliver real business benefits. We are also proud to be one of the UK’s first training companies to achieve the IET Centres of Excellence.”

Courses delivered nationwide

The Group consistently deliver a huge range of electrical courses and a wide variety of specialist skills that won’t be found anywhere else in the UK. Courses can be delivered at our state-of-the-art facilities nationwide, or onsite almost anywhere in the UK and can vary in duration and intensity from one day courses to extended periods up to sixteen weeks. Courses offered include C&G 2382-18 18th Edition, C&G 2391 Inspection & Testing, C&G 2365 Diploma Level 2 & 3, C&G 2377 PAT Testing, C&G 2396 Electrical Design, C&G 2919 EV Car Charging Point Installers courses, Emergency Lighting, Fire Alarms Training, BPEC Solar PV and many more.

We are here to help

When it comes to electrical training we understand that no two businesses are the same and therefore will have different training requirements. Our dedicated training supervisors are on hand to work with and identify the needs of our customers and programmes offered can be completely bespoke, or an amalgamation of existing qualifications to provide the right mix of certification to meet our customer's needs.

If you would like to speak to a training supervisor please contact 0800 856 4448, or for more information please visit Trade Skills Business.

 

Categories: bespoke electrical training, training centres, trade skills business

Send me over the edge!

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 7th August 2018

charity abseil

This September our very own Liliane Branca, Tutor at Trade Skills 4U Gatwick facility, will be ‘stepping over the edge’ in a charity abseil to raise funds for Chestnut Tree House, the children’s hospice for Sussex and South East Hampshire, helping life-limited children and their families.

Liliane said “I am taking part in the Arundel Castle Abseil on Saturday 29th September for Chestnut Tree House when I'll be abseiling 180 feet down the Bake House Tower in the grounds of Arundel Castle, and as far as I know I'm not afraid of heights...”

“This is my first charity fundraising event and I’m hoping to raise enough funds to help pay towards the care costs of the Chestnut Tree House’s care services, who offer incredible support to those that need it most.

“I have chosen to support this worthy charity due to my own personal experience when I sadly lost my Godson Matthew due to heart problems at the very young age of 22 months. I am therefore, very much aware of the impact a child with a life-limiting illness can have on family members and also close family friends.

“The Chestnut Tree House is such a worthy charity that helps support the families of children affected, not only during their illness but also for the years following.”

Care services at Chestnut Tree House

Chestnut Tree House children’s hospice cares for around 300 children all of whom are unlikely to reach adulthood. The Community Nursing Team visit families at home, taking children out to explore their local community or simply giving tired families and carers the chance to take a well-earned break.

Children and families can also visit Chestnut Tree House’s beautiful hospice near Arundel where kids can be astronauts for the day in the multi-sensory room, or discover creepy crawlies on a woodland walk where parents can just be parents and not carers, and where siblings have people to talk to who understand.

Then, when the time comes, Chestnut Tree helps children and families say goodbye in whatever way feels right for them, either at home or in the hospice itself. They offer ongoing bereavement support for the whole family.

Whilst the hospice itself is near Arundel, Chestnut Tree has had a physical presence in Eastbourne for many years, initially working from a Co-Hub in the town centre before taking on their own offices and finally moving to Pacific House in February 2016. The office provides a base for the East Sussex care team and for a small fundraising team who focus solely on raising funds and awareness in East Sussex.

It costs over £3.9 million every year to provide Chestnut Tree House’s specialist care services and less than 6% of that comes from central Government. All care is offered to families free of charge, so the charity relies heavily on the support of the local community.

Everyone at Trade Skills 4U wishes Liliane well in her daredevil abseil, and we look forward to sharing some great action shots with you after the event!.

If you would like to find out more about what they charity is about, or to sponsor Liliane please visit her JustGiving page. 

Categories: charity, abseil, arundel castle

Four things to consider when replacing a consumer unit

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 1st August 2018

replacing a consumer unit

There are a number of reasons why property owners change their consumer unit. Perhaps one of the MCBs has blown and replacements are no longer available. Maybe they have taken possession of an old property and the consumer unit is not compliant with current regulations (soon to be the 18th Edition). Or maybe they are undertaking a rewire, refurbishment or larger renovation project.

Whichever is applicable there are four key things the electrical contractor should consider.

1. Your client is not a qualified electrician

The single most important thing for the electrical contractor to remember is that regardless of how much research they’ve done or how intelligent they are, your client is not a professional electrician, has never before replaced a consumer unit and is unlikely to be aware of all the issues.

The electrical contractor should always encourage the customer to have an Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR), which should be carried out before replacing the consumer unit. This is to establish that the latest regulations are met and will ensure that the contractor isn’t left with faults to clear that were not included in the original contract.

The EICR test results will then help with the design and selection of protective devices for the new consumer unit.

Educating your client regarding the level of protection that is required under BS7671 will help you design a solution which matches their requirements, budget and expectations and need not be any more onerous than briefly explaining the following:

a. In general the UK Wiring Regulations require that all circuits are protected against both:

Overload – the fault which can result in fire in cables and damage to appliances.

Residual Current (or Earth Leakage) – the fault which causes electric shock, which can result in injury or death.

b. The Circuit Protection Devices: RCD, MCB and RCBO. What they are and what they do:

RCD – Residual Current Device

Protects a bank of circuits from residual current or earth leakage.

MCB – Mini Circuit Breaker - Protects an individual circuit against overload and fault currents

RCBO – Residual Circuit Breaker with Overload - Protects an individual circuit from both residual current and overload. It combines the aspects of both RCD and MCB and is therefore more expensive than an MCB.

2. Future proof …like there’s no tomorrow!!

There’s not a single building project in history during which the client did not, at some point, change their mind or the specification. As the project progresses they may change the gas hob to an electric one, decide that they want to put an electric shower in the guest room or decide they want to install a security system.

The electrical contractor must remember this is entirely reasonable and prepare for rather than react to it. Giving yourself plenty of wiggle room at the outset will avoid hassle and wasted effort later in the project when the inevitable happens. Explain at the start of the project that the consumer unit will serve the property for some considerable time and should be able to comfortably handle any changes and additions to circuit layout in coming years.

If during the design the contractor defines 10 ways is required then at the very least fit a 12 way consumer unit. If a 12 ways is required then go for 15, if 16 go for 20 etc.

3. High priority circuits and circuit separation

In order to properly specify a circuit protection solution which fits with the client’s expectations it is vital to ascertain which circuits require special consideration in respect of RCD’s.

Separation of high priority circuits is important because it removes any chance of that circuit being knocked out by an earth leakage fault on any other. This occurs in a standard RCD/MCB configuration when the RCD cuts the power to all MCBs it is protecting upon detection of a residual current fault on one. ..and of course, this problem is exacerbated when a greater number circuits fall under the protection of one RCD.

Common high priority circuits include smoke alarms and security systems but every client will have a different attitude to what constitutes ‘high priority’: the freezer in one home for example, may just be host to some out of date fish fingers, while another household’s freezer contains expensive cuts of venison! Home offices containing PCs, tropical fish tanks, stairwell lighting, swimming pool pumps and heating systems are all examples of high priority circuits.

4. Which type of consumer unit?

A number of factors determine which consumer unit you will ultimately fit, including the number of circuits, types of circuit and client’s budget. The three main models are:

i. Fully Loaded Consumer Unit

Fully loaded consumer unit

This is a popular solution due to its low cost and comprises a dual RCD board supplied complete with MCBs. They are suitable for smaller properties with less complex circuits and are available in a number of ‘ways’, depending on the manufacturer:

Hager: 6 way (VML733H), 10 way (VML755), 12 way (VML766), 16 way (VML716)

MK:  10 way (K7666SMET), 15 way (K7668SMET)

Wylex: 10 way (NHRSS10SSLHI), 15 way (NHRS15SSLHI)

Contactum: 10 way (DDS10166MS-PO1), 12 way (DDS12188MS-P010), 16 way  (DDS16166MS-PO1)

The main drawback with fully loaded consumer units is that they usually offer limited configuration flexibility and circuit separation. Indeed, some of the boards above are entirely fixed with no provision for high-priority circuits, such as the Hager VML755 which offers 5 fixed MCB ways on each RCD and does not allow for the fitting of RCBOs.

ii. Main Switch Consumer Unit

Main switch consumer unit

This is considered by some as the best circuit protection solution available as it offers total circuit separation but there is a cost implication. It is supplied with just the main switch and allows for every circuit to be RCBO protected. Whilst the consumer unit itself is not particularly expensive the installation of RCBOs makes this a premium solution. Such units are available in all sizes from 5 way up to 40 way. Hager and Wylex have a particularly good offering in the larger units over 20 ways.

iii. High Integrity Consumer Unit

High intensity consumer unit

This solution is becoming increasingly popular as it combines the best aspects of a dual RCD unit and main switch consumer unit. Built with three neutral bars, and supplied with 2 RCDs, the HI consumer unit allows for both 2 banks of MCBs and a further bank of RCBOs for high-priority circuits.

This means that standard circuits such as lighting and ring finals are given commensurate residual current protection, whilst high priority circuits are afforded total circuit separation. HI Units were introduced by Wylex about ten years ago and originally were only available in larger duplex arrangements of over 20 ways. Nowadays however, all the major manufacturers offer HI solutions with models as small as 10 ways, offering both the homeowner and professional electrician excellent flexibility over circuit design at affordable prices.

We hope this article helps with your decision making when replacing a consumer unit and we would like to thank Gil-Lec Electrical Wholesalers for supplying the content for this article. 

Categories: wiring regulations, consumer unit, electrical installation condition report, eicr

Case Study - David Murby

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 31st July 2018

Electrician Case Study

Name: David Murby

Company: Prospect Electrics

Course: Bronze Package, C&G 2377, C&G 2391

What did you do before you trained to be an electrician?

I left school and went to university to do a degree in physics. After graduating I started working for the then TSB Group as a programmer. I spent 25 years working with software for various companies in banking, warehousing and then for many years in motor insurance. I progressed up the career ladder from programmer to manager to IT Director, finally ending up as the Managing Director of a division of a FTSE 100 company. As I gained ‘promotions’ I moved further and further away from the activities I enjoyed, so I decided to go self employed as a contractor and interim manager. After completing one long contract, I was trying to figure out what to do next as I was getting a little frustrated working on long term projects that I managed but didn’t produce anything directly myself.

I have a very close friend from school, Norman, who after many years working for a bank became an electrician about 10 years ago, so I was inspired by his change of career. I was fortunate that I had a little money in the bank so was able to take some time to train and then invest in the business to set myself up.  After the initial training with Trade Skills 4U I was able to spend some time with Norman to learn many of the real-world practical skills that it’s almost impossible to learn in a classroom.

Which courses have you taken with Trade Skills 4U and why?

I took the Silver Domestic installer package initially as my aim was, and still is, to focus on the domestic installation business.

After about 6 months I took the 2391-52 Inspection and Testing course as I felt this would greatly improve my testing and inspection knowledge as well as allow me to carry out EICRs, which has been really useful to my business.

What was your training experience like with Trade Skills 4U?

I thought the set-up in Gatwick was excellent. The facilities are very good and very professional. The instructors are really knowledgeable and approachable and the support team that back them up are very helpful. When I was looking to do the 2391-52 I looked briefly at other facilities nearer to me in Reading but very quickly made the decision that it was worth the travelling to go back to Trade Skills 4U.

Tell us about your electrical business and how these course have helped you?

My business is just me and it has built up well over the 18 months since I started. I’m fortunate that I have been able to build up the projects I’ve done over time from simple light fitting changes and socket installations, right through to outdoor garden lighting projects and a three-story extension full wiring first and second fit.

The courses I’ve done have given me all the theoretical knowledge I’ve needed to do all of this, although I do find myself regularly going back to the books of course. Building up the practical knowledge carefully, making sure I don’t take on anything I was unsure about my capability for and having my old school friend Norman around as a sounding board, has enabled me to do the practical stuff that the courses equipped me for.

What are your plans for your business?

I’m happily going to stay on my own, building a solid business with a good reputation. Word of mouth has been very helpful to me already and I think many of the skills I had before I changed career have positioned me well, complementing the electrical knowledge I’ve gained. Skills like organisation, communication and customer focus that are common to any business regardless of industry.

Are you planning on taking any other courses to add to your revenue stream?

I thought about doing the Solar installer course but that not is so much of a job for someone on their own. Also I decided that at 50 I’m a little old to be climbing around on roofs! I may well do the Electric Vehicle Installer Course but at the moment I seem to be busy enough with the core domestic work.  Clearly, I’m going to need to do the 18th Edition updates and future revisions to keep up to date.

What has your experience been like working in the industry?

I get great pleasure from the feeling of completion I get from finishing something every week, and sometimes every day. Coming from software projects that can drag on for months and sometimes years without any obvious major output milestones this is very refreshing. When you get to the end of the day, press the switch and the lights come on and the customer is very happy, it is a great feeling.

I’ve also found it interesting coming from an industry where I could be involved in multi-million-pound projects where there is very individual accountability when things go wrong. In this industry you can go and do a project that could take as little as a day and be of the order of a couple of hundred pounds and, if it is done wrong, there is real danger to the customer and true accountability for the contractor (you can go to prison in the extreme). Part of the job is educating the customer because what seems simple to them can often involve a lot more than they think and I now see why the public often undervalue the skilled trades. This is where being a member of the NICEIC has been useful to me and I see that NAPIT, ELECSA and other trade bodies are trying hard to get the public to understand the needs to have correctly trained people carry out work.

What advice would you give to someone looking to train as an electrician?

Get a good mentor – I could not have done this without my friend Norman who has been an inspiration and sounding block throughout the whole process. You need someone you can discuss things with and learn from. Also, have a good financial plan so you know what you are getting into as the set-up costs are not small if you want to do this properly.

How would you describe the facilities and training at Trade Skills 4U?

Firstly, all the instructors I dealt with were first class. They explained everything clearly and sometimes from two or three different approaches to allow for the different learning styles of different class members. They have great experience (and great patience) to draw upon.

The facilities are very good for learning. There is plenty of practical application and opportunity to get on the tools as well as the theoretical learning. The balance between the two in the Silver course I did was really good.

We would like to thank David for sharing his experiences with us and wish him well for the future.

Categories: qualifications, electrician, case study, trade

All new homes to include electric car charging points!

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 11th July 2018

In 2017 the Government announced plans to ban all new petrol and diesel cars in the UK from 2040 in a bid to tackle air pollution. Following this, the Government has just announced that in order to cut emissions further all new homes in suburban England would need to be fitted with electric vehicle charging points.

Further details of a sales ban relating to conventional diesel and petrol vehicles by the year 2040 are also expected to be set out.

Dirty vehicle charging zones

The government's overall target is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the UK by at least 80% of the 1990 levels by 2050.

In order to assist councils tackle emissions, ministers have unveiled a £255m fund, allocated to aid a charging infrastructure where there will be potential for charging zones to be introduced for the dirtiest vehicles.

Transport Secretary Chris Grayling has announced proposals that aim to make recharging electric vehicles much easier than refuelling petrol or diesel cars. The proposals will include the need to assess whether new homes and offices require charging points to be installed as standard.

Mr Grayling said that “these proposed measures would ensure that the UK would have one of the most comprehensive support packages for zero-emission vehicles in the world. The prize is not just a cleaner and healthier environment but a UK economy fit for the future and the chance to win a substantial slice of a market estimated to be worth up to £7.6 trillion by 2050".

Street lights to include charge points

Mr Grayling also proposes, where there is on-street parking new street light columns should also be fitted with charging points where appropriate, making it easier for more people to recharge their vehicles.

Demand for electric vehicle points increase

It was recently reported that in the first six months of 2018 electric vehicles made up 5.5% of the UK's new car market. This compares with 4.3% from the same period in 2017.

The increase in electric vehicles will only get higher, and with this in mind coupled with Government proposals above, this is great news for any electrician looking to add EV car charging point installation as an additional revenue stream.

We are pleased to announced that we have recently partnered with Rolec and are now offering three electric vehicle charging point courses:

New Blue: Domestic EV Car Charging Point Installers Package (22 day course) – designed for new entrants who want to carry out both domestic installations and offer a standalone domestic car charging point installation service. The package includes the Bronze Domestic Installer course together with the C&G 2919-02 domestic car charging point installation course. The new 18th Edition course is also included in this package.

C&G 2919-01 Electric Car / Vehicle Charging Point Installers Course (2 day course) – designed for fully qualified electricians and covers commercial installations and all the key skills to install, fault find and inspect and test electric vehicle charging points.

C&G 2919-02 Domestic EV Charging Point Installers Course (4 day course) – designed for Domestic Installers who wish to upgrade their knowledge and learn how to install, fault find and inspect and test domestic car charging points.

Students who successfully pass these courses will be automatically registered on Rolec’s approved installer’s scheme and will appear on their national database of installers.

To find out more about the courses we offer please click here, alternatively please call our course advisors today on 0800 8056 4448.

Categories: diesel and petrol car ban, green house gas emissions, electric vehicle, car charging, government policy

Trade Skills 4U Partner with Rolec to Offer New Electrical Course

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 5th July 2018

We are pleased to announce a partnership with Rolec to introduce a new Electric Vehicle Course.

The collaboration comes after demand for electric vehicle points are on the rise across the country, and the need for qualified and skilled electricians are in need in this particular area.

We will deliver the Blue Domestic Installer course throughout the three training facilities based in Gatwick, Warrington and the recently opened Leeds centre. The course will run for 22 days, and is specially designed for those over 18 years old who are new to the electrical industry, wanting to offer a standalone service alongside other domestic installations.

As part of the exciting partnership with Rolec, students who have successfully passed the course will be automatically registered on the approved Rolec installer’s scheme. They will also be handed a Rolec welcome pack with an assigned contact at the company who will assist them if they should need it. Listing qualified electricians onto the installer scheme is extremely beneficial and means their name will appear on a national database which will enable them to work on jobs in the local and regional area.

Carl Bennett CEO of Trade Skills 4U said: “We are excited to move forward with the new partnership with Rolec. We believe the government’s initiative to eliminate all petrol and diesel cars by 2040 will mean the need for installing electrical vehicle points will rise. We are also pleased that the partnership Rolec will hugely benefit our students once they have qualified. As part of our appreciation we have named a training room the Rolec Suite that students will study in.”

Kieron Alsop, Managing Director of Rolec said: “We are delighted to be supporting and sponsoring Trade Skills 4U’s new EV charge point installation training course.

“The course will accommodate the full Rolec EV charging range, as well as marketing and technical documentation to support the course.

“Trade Skills 4U’s new training facilities are highly impressive and will enable training to be provided to a high standard, in a comfortable and modern environment.”

This course is great for those wanting to enter the trade on a domestic installer level. The content is stuctured to build your knowledge and skills up from a basic to advanced level so you can enter the industry confidently. 

To find out more about the course click here or speak to a course advisor today on: 0800 8056 4448

Categories: training, qualifications, electrical course