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18th Edition Video Questions Answered

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 13th November 2018

We recently published a video in partnership with Prysmian on Facebook. The video has had an immense response and there were a number of questions raised by viewers of varying levels of experience. So, we thought it a great idea to bring all of those questions together into one blog post.

If you want to know the key dates effecting you check out this blog post here.

1. When do the regulations come into effect?

From January 2019, this means electricians need to have gained the updated qualification by then.

2. What does it mean for RCD breakers and how do they work?

The RCD is broken into two devices with no overload protection, it also has a built in circuit breaker. An RCBO combines a circuit breaker characteristics with additional protection given by the residual current device (RCD), which in turn monitors the earth fault leakage. An RCD on its own will not offer overload protection.

3. Differences in Inspection & Testing?

Inspection is simply a visual assessment of the electrical installation, whereas testing involves using measuring equipment to verify it is safe to into a service.

4. How are the changes to the way the PFC is measured and the changes in the certificate?

Chapters 61, 62 and 63 have all been deleted and replaced by chapters 64 and 65. No major changes to our approach to inspection and testing except ring final circuit conductors now fall under the “continuity of conductors” regulation 643.2. Supply polarity 643.6 needs to verify before the system is energised. PFC 643.7.3.201 is still required at all relevant points of the installation and appendix 12 goes into further details of the requirements and features for domestic installations. Regarding the new model certificates in BS7671 a few new columns have been added to the schedules of test results such as a maximum circuit Zs value, insulation resistance test voltages applied and a column for AFDD for functions tests (if applicable). A few other details have changed in the EIC, EICR and the schedule of inspections. The biggest change has to be the minor works certificate where more information is now required.

5. Why are the regulations updated so often?

The regulations are updated so often due to innovation and new and emerging technologies. The UK is a member is of Cenelec, a European committee who set the standards for electro technology which we are legally obligated to abide by. The likelihood is, we will remain in this commission post Brexit. The BSI (British Standards Institution) and IET (Institution of Engineering and Technology) play a part in setting the new regulations. The IET collate new information and write the latest regulations and the BSI publish the documents.

6. When can we expect the 19th edition?

The likelihood is the first amendment will go ahead in approximately three years. Generally, looking at past editions a new edition will be published every 10 years.

7. Will the UK introduce flat twin and CPS with all conductors the same size and all insulated throughout their length?

The uninsulated CPS cable design developed and used in the UK for many years and we are unaware of any interest in changing it.

8. Are ‘YY type’ cables allowed for fixed installations?

In BS7671, it states all equipment we install should have a BS or BSEN specification standard. YY type cables have no specification, BS or EN so their use is discouraged. Technically this would be a departure from the BS7671 and must be recorded accordingly.

9. Are AFDD – Arc fault detection devices recommended?

In section 421.47 the Arc Fault is only recommended for providing additional safety against fire. However, it isn’t necessarily required for domestic properties but could be useful in the following types of premises:

- Any type of sleeping accommodation

- Fire propagating structures

- Properties such museums and art galleries with irreplaceable goods in

An AFDD will identify any Arc faults and they will isolate the circuit if any arc faults are detected to prevent fire.

10. SPD’s – what are they?

An SPD is a Search Protection Device. You have to install one of these devices when conducting an installation.  If you don’t, as a qualified electrician you have to provide a risk assessment as to why you don’t need to do this. An SPD detects current surges within an electrical system, these surges are monitored/picked up by SPD’s to protect the electrical installation. This is installed to reduce the risk of fire and protecting equipment.

11. What are fire resistant fixings?

These are generally steel or copper cable supports fixed directly to the structure of the building so that in the event of a fire cables remain in place for as long as possible. Before this clause cables were fixed with plastic which would not resist the fire and fallen cables would become a hazard to fire fighters. Four fire fighters died in two separate incidents as a result of their entanglement in the prematurely collapsed cables.

 

If you would like to watch the video head over to the Trade Skills 4U Facebook page: 

Also, if you would like to book onto an 18th Edition course we have a range of courses happening throughout the country as well as weekend courses. For more information click here:

Categories: electrical, training, electrician, 18th edition

Halloween Hall of Horrors

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 26th October 2018

Whether you are preparing for a spookfest with friends or getting ready for the trick-or-treaters, let’s think about all the electrical horrors we come across day to day at work.

Sparks who squeeze themselves into small dark loft spaces with hidden spiders or have to work in creepy basements come across some sights. There’s also the real danger of working with faulty electrics, exposed wires and installations placed where they shouldn’t be.

With the scare season officially upon us, we take a look at some truly shocking electrical installations.

 

Imagine getting tangled in this mess!

 

Would you want to touch this to try and fix it? 

 

Can you spot what's wrong in this picture?

 

This is truly shocking!! Who on earth left this panel like this?

 

This looks like something straight out of horror movie. Would you follow what this note says?!

 

What a mess this looks like to work with! Where would you start!

 

Correct IP rating? You tell us!

 

Could you try out this balancing act?

 

Can you sense the tension in the room??

 

What a tangled mess! We wouldn't want this to sort through on a Friday!

The above electrical horrors emphasise how important it is to always employ a qualified electrician to do the job properly! 

Make sure your electrics are always safe. If you have any concerns about electrics in your home or workplace, you can ask an electrician to carry out an EICR (electrical installation condition report).

Happy Halloween everyone, we hope you enjoyed looking through the scary pictures!!!!

Categories: halloween, shocks, spooks, horror

Case Study - Dan Wainwright

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 16th October 2018

 

1. What did you do before you trained to become an electrician?

I was a self-employed industrial door engineer, working many hours a day. It wasn’t an exciting job and the day to day duties became too repetitive.

2. Why did you decide to take the 2365?

I chose to train as an electrician because I wanted to challenge myself and gain a nationally recognised qualification. From the research I did about the Level 2 & 3 2365, I knew it would be the best way for me train and learn in-depth knowledge of electrical systems within the right timeframe.

3. Have you taken any additional courses with TS4U? If so, which ones and why?

Yes, I have taken the 2919-01 EV charging course. I wanted to add this additional qualification on because I think EV charging is a rapidly growing industry which I want to be a part of.

4. What was your overall experience with TS4U?

I really enjoyed my time at the Warrington centre. The staff and tutors were excellent and professional from start to finish. Also, because you are studying with the same group people for a long length of time, you make some great friends who all help each out and see one another succeed.

5. What did you enjoy from the course?

That there was always something new to learn. I felt every day was different, and I was so impressed by the amount of knowledge passed on from the tutors. The practical sessions were always the best for me.

6. Did you struggle with any parts of the course?

Yes, I felt I struggled the most with the maths & science topics. However, the tutors are extremely helpful and they make sure you have a full understanding of the theory side of the course.

7. Have you managed to get any on site experience whilst studying? If so, what is this?

Yes, I’ve been wiring industrial doors on site. I feel I have become more confident as the course has gone on and feel more skilled to work on other projects now too.

8. Have you managed to find employment since training with TS4U?

I managed to find employment towards the end of my course. Through my new qualifications I have been offered and job with Chargemaster plc.

9. Where do you hope your qualifications will take you?

With the knowledge gained, I hope my new employer will make me a specialist in my choice of field.

10. What advice would you give to someone who is thinking of want to become an electrician?

Don't ponder it, just do it! The qualifications can take you through any route including domestic, commercial, EV and electrical design. Retraining as an electrician has been one of the best experiences I have had and I would highly recommend it to anyone. 

Categories: qualified, electrician, electric vehicle, career

Trade Skills 4U Partner with Rolec to Offer New Electrical Course

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 5th July 2018

We are pleased to announce a partnership with Rolec to introduce a new Electric Vehicle Course.

The collaboration comes after demand for electric vehicle points are on the rise across the country, and the need for qualified and skilled electricians are in need in this particular area.

We will deliver the Blue Domestic Installer course throughout the three training facilities based in Gatwick, Warrington and the recently opened Leeds centre. The course will run for 22 days, and is specially designed for those over 18 years old who are new to the electrical industry, wanting to offer a standalone service alongside other domestic installations.

As part of the exciting partnership with Rolec, students who have successfully passed the course will be automatically registered on the approved Rolec installer’s scheme. They will also be handed a Rolec welcome pack with an assigned contact at the company who will assist them if they should need it. Listing qualified electricians onto the installer scheme is extremely beneficial and means their name will appear on a national database which will enable them to work on jobs in the local and regional area.

Carl Bennett CEO of Trade Skills 4U said: “We are excited to move forward with the new partnership with Rolec. We believe the government’s initiative to eliminate all petrol and diesel cars by 2040 will mean the need for installing electrical vehicle points will rise. We are also pleased that the partnership Rolec will hugely benefit our students once they have qualified. As part of our appreciation we have named a training room the Rolec Suite that students will study in.”

Kieron Alsop, Managing Director of Rolec said: “We are delighted to be supporting and sponsoring Trade Skills 4U’s new EV charge point installation training course.

“The course will accommodate the full Rolec EV charging range, as well as marketing and technical documentation to support the course.

“Trade Skills 4U’s new training facilities are highly impressive and will enable training to be provided to a high standard, in a comfortable and modern environment.”

This course is great for those wanting to enter the trade on a domestic installer level. The content is stuctured to build your knowledge and skills up from a basic to advanced level so you can enter the industry confidently. 

To find out more about the course click here or speak to a course advisor today on: 0800 8056 4448

Categories: training, qualifications, electrical course

Top Tips on Quoting Electrical Jobs

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 21st June 2018

Estimating the cost of a job depends on a few factors whatever trade you may be working in. It becomes easier to price jobs once you have more experience under your belt. Being able to quote jobs correctly ensures your company will continue to run efficiently. It’s key to remember to get the balance correct in not overpricing or under-pricing jobs, where you as the tradesman could potentially be left out of pocket.

An electrician can be put under pressure from potential customers to provide a quote on the spot as people are generally time poor. Ideally, an electrician would visit a job and provide a cost one or two days later. However, with people wanting quotes immediately combined with the amount of competitors out there vying for business, it’s important to have an idea of cost of materials and your hourly rate. This way you can prepare and calculate effectively without the added pressure.

To help you offer the best prices for customers, we have put a guide together.

Price of Resources

As mentioned before, it’s a good idea to have rough knowledge of the prices of parts and materials and the length of time it takes to work with these parts. Also, considerations need to be made for bulk buying prices or purchasing in smaller amounts from suppliers as this will have an effect on prices.

Remember to keep in mind materials can fluctuate in price all the time. Copper wire can change over time and geographically. Keep a number of suppliers in mind to see who offers the best price for materials in line with the particular job.

Competitors

This should always be at the forefront of your mind. It’s good business practice to not just know who you’re competing against but also what they are charging and quoting customers.

If a customer has been shopping around, asking them outright what they have been quoted can give you figures to work with and lets the customer also receive the best price for the quality of work they will receive. Don’t be afraid to ask this question as it could put you in a better position and shows you have their best interests in mind.

Location

Factoring where you will be based for the day or coming weeks will have an impact on your travelling costs too. Make sure the price of fuel or transport is included in the costings so they are covered.

Scale of the Job

Assessing the scale of the job is important. Knowing whether it is too much to take on or if the job will take a few weeks can have an impact on the price. Within this, it’s essential to consider whether tools will need to be hired for the job as these will need to be factored into the price. Judging if the job will require an extra pair of hands will need to be filtered in as you will need to include the following; pay, employer’s liability insurance and workplace safety.

Market conditions

Understanding market conditions will help you offer the best price. Looking at the economy in general to see if customers are spending money or if they are cost-cutting will enable to you price according to their budget.

Having awareness of the local and regional electrical market will give you the upper-hand when providing quotes. If you are the only electrician in the vicinity you will have a majority share of the market and will hopefully be in demand! However, if the market is saturated with electricians your pricing will need to reflect this and be competitive.

Other considerations that will drive your prices up and down will be the potential changes to tax import duties, employment law (if required) and changes in regulations.

Handling your Time

Managing your diary will enable you to handle your jobs effectively. This will generally come with experience as you start to understand how long each job will take you. However, it’s good practice to tell your customers when you will be able to work on a project and if for any reason you get a cancellation you can bump your next customer up. This will show that you’re keen to work on the job and get it completed for them.

Experience

Take each job as a learning experience. Once you have quoted and worked on a few electrical jobs you will begin to gain a better understanding of your own pricing structure.

You will learn what jobs are the most profitable and the length of time it will take you to complete different workloads. As time goes on, you will become more confident and will be able to provide correct quotes to customers and know which jobs to turn down if you have to.

Within this time, you should be able to build a good solid reputation for yourself and your business which should always mean you’re busy!

We hope this guide is useful and you will go out into the industry prepared and ready to work on different electrical projects.

Categories: pricing, electrician, quotes, customers, business

Case Study Kenny Whittle

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 24th May 2018

 

Course: 2365 Level 2 & 3

1. What did you do before you started training to be an electrician?

Before training at Trade Skills 4U, I worked in asset management. 

2. What was your reason for training?

I chose to train as an electrician because I had grown tired with working in an office environment and travelling to the same place of work day after day. I wanted abit more variety.

3. Why did you choose the electrical field?

Before becoming an asset manager, I worked in a factory producing vehicle wiring harnesses, thus, electrical work was the obvious choice. Also, working as an electrician would allow me to work in different locations and earn good money at the sme time so it met my needs.

4. Are you working as an electrician whilst studying?

I started working as an electrician 2 months into my level 2 course, for a company that maintains the electrical systems in a newspaper printers whilst also taking on various other contracts.The 2365 course allowed me to come into the industry and prove useful to the team on day one. I also noticed that as I progressed through the course, I could continue to take on more responsibility and tasks.

5. What do you enjoy most about the course? 

As a fan of science, particularly physics, I enjoyed learning about the theory behind electricity and how to carry out cable calculations.

6. Are you struggling with any of the topics?

So far, I haven't struggled with any of the topics or modules.

7. How would you describe the facilities at TS4U?

TS4U facilities are excellent. At no point did the group lose out due to facilities not being adequate.

8. Do you have any plans to gain more electrical qualifications?

I will use TS4U in the near future to get my inspection and testing certificate. Doing the course, and it being so diverse has made me realise how much I enjoy the theoretical and designing side of the industry. So I am contemplating further qualifications in that field.

9. What advice would you give to others thinking of taking the 2365?

Just sign up and change your life for the better. The course is over before you know it and then you are away. I am disappointed with myself I didn't do it sooner.

10. What are your plans for the future?

I will spend a few years on the tools as was my initial reason for starting the course, but eventually I would like to go into designing installations and perhaps teaching later on.

Categories: qualifications, case study, electrician, trade

New Yorkshire Facility Opens with Great Success!

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 11th May 2018

On Wednesday 9th May, we officially opened our brand new Yorkshire facility on Hawthorne Park, East Leeds. The event opened with an inspirational speech from CEO Carl Bennett, who spoke about his journey to forming Trade Skills 4U in 2005 and the reasons he did so at the age of 40. Carl continued to speak about the positive impacts electrical training courses can have on people’s lives and the excellent company values we possess.

After Carl finished his speech, we heard from Leeds City Councillor Mohammed Rafique the Executive Member for Employment, Enterprise and Opportunity. Mohammed gave a warm welcome to the new centre, and stated how excited he was to introduce us to the city and regional area. He went on to mention the rate and speed Yorkshire is growing and how there is a great need for electricians and fellow tradesman in the area. He also said these newly skilled people will contribute greatly to the region.

Councillor Rafique finished by thanking us for investing in the city and said that he is looking forward to hearing about the progress students make at the centre going forward.

 

Click below to watch the video:

 

 

Once the speeches had finished, guests were invited to explore the centre and speak with tutors and staff about the various courses available. Others ventured outside to watch the Tesla car do its dance! Or have a go on the power tools supplied by Hitachi. Quest electrical wholesalers were also in attendance to speak to those who needed any advice. 

Inside the building there was a chance to win a KT63 by completing the giant Buzz-wire in the fastest time. The quickest time we recorded was an incredibly fast 35 seconds by Haider Nawaz, so a tester will be on its way to him soon! 

Throughout the afternoon there were various seminars and interactive sessions taking place that our guests were welcome to join. These included an 18th Edition Preview, Electric Vehicle charging seminar hosted by Rolec and an interactive practical and Interactive Science session. 

We are extremely happy that the day ran very smoothly and hope that our guests enjoyed the activities on offer and free food supplied by KK Catering Ltd. We’d like to give a massive thank you to everyone who attended and we hope to see you back in the centre very soon. We’re very excited for the new courses to begin on the 14th May 2018 and wish all prospective students the very best.

If you would like to visit the centre for a tour or to and speak to a tutor please contact us on: 0800 856 4448 alternatively, if you are interested in booking a course, please Click here for a full list of courses on offer at the new Yorkshire facility.

Categories: training, electrician, yorkshire, leeds

Case Study - Libby Rush

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 27th March 2018

 

Name: Libby Rush

Course: Bronze + PAT

Libby is studying Engineering at university and decided to come to Trade Skills 4U to gain some more hands on experience. Here, she discusses how she found the course and why more women should enter the trade.

1. What is your reason for training?

I'm training as part of my graduate engineering scheme to improve my practical skills and become more familiar with building and wiring regulations.

2. Tell us why you decided to train as an electrican?

My employer has sent me to this course because at university I had very little hands on experience, since traditional education has a very heavy focus on science and design theory. This scheme puts that theory into the context of the real world and demonstrates the additional considerations needed to successfully design a circuit.

3. How long have you been working in the electrical industry?

I graduated from a 4 year university course in 2017 and have been in my role for 6 months.

4. Tell us about your current job? 

I am a graduate control, electrical and instrumentation engineer so my day to day includes a lot of computer based design. As part of the development programme I will be moving around different departments so I can learn more about how they work.

5. Why did you decide to take the Bronze course?

My employer has sent previous employees to Trade Skills 4U and received really positive feedback about the scheme so they've to incorporated it into the graduate development programme. 

6. Tell us about your experience with TS4U?

My experience at trade skills 4u has been absolutely fantastic, the support available for people like me with little knowledge in the subject was incredible. All the staff I've found to be really approachable as well as professional.

7. What did you enjoy most about the course?

The interactive way the courses were taught which allowed for back and forth of questions was a great way to build a rapport with the instructor and create a more comfortable learning environment. Teaching theory along side the practical elements also really helped me relate what we were doing in the workrooms to something I knew about.

8. What did you find most challenging about the course?

Jumping in day one into a pure practical exercise was challenging for me whilst other students were really in their element. It was the first time I got hand cramp outside of an exam, trying to keep up with everyone else.

9. Do you have any advice for women who are thinking of entering the trade?

I recommend finding a balance between powering through on your own and knowing when to ask for help. Working together and talking through problems is one of the best ways to learn and also break the ice, but don't be afraid to say no and that you want to do it by yourself. Ultimately, if someone else is over your shoulder and offering to tweak your work it won't benefit anyone in the long run.

10. Do you think there’s plenty of opportunities for those working in the electrical industry?

I've found a lot of opportunities within my area when I was looking for training schemes. It's such a vast industry there are so many levels to jump in on.

We wish Libby the best of luck with the rest of her training and new job!

Categories: qualification, case study, electrician, trade

18th Edition Wiring Regulations - Major Shift or Update?

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 13th March 2018

The new 18th Edition is due to be launched in July this year with changes coming into effect in January 2019. We’ve taken a look to see if there are any significant modifications to the 17th or if they are more like updates to be aware of.

Before we get into the nitty gritty of the regulations, there’s notable changes to the structure and layout of the book. Sparks used to have to navigate through the book by using a fragmented, sectioned based multiple contents guide, which most people didn’t find very user friendly. Now the book has a much larger contents section which has been formatted for a more holistic approach. This should now make it easier for electricians to navigate their way through the book to find the regulation they require.

We’ve taken a look through the regulations and highlighted what we think has changed in the new 18th Edition.   

Part 1

There’s only minor changes in part 1, these are slight amendments on information on electrical installation certificate.

Part 2

Chapter 41 – There are a number of significant changes taking place under this section. We’ve highlighted the two we think are most noteworthy.

• Regulation 411.3.3 has been revised and now applies to socket-outlets with a rated current not exceeding 32A. There is an exception to omit RCD protection where, other than a dwelling, a documented risk assessment determines that RCD protection is not necessary.

• A new Regulation 411.3.4 requires that, within domestic (household) premises, additional protection by an RCD with a rated residual operating current not exceeding 30 mA shall be provided for AC final circuits supplying luminaires.

Main changes include further use of RCD’s for domestic households. Including RCD protection for all lighting circuits and socket outlets rated up to 32A when previously 20A.

It’s important to note for domestic properties the regulation has been deleted that allows the use of RCD protection for a single socket outlet to be omitted as a permitted exception.

Chapter 42

Protection against thermal effects

•  A new Regulation 421.1.7 has been introduced recommending the installation of arc fault detection devices (AFDDs) to mitigate the risk of fire in AC final circuits of a fixed installation due to the effects of arc fault currents.

The main changes in this section includes the use of arc fault protection. These work by detecting a fault at a very early stage, reducing the magnitude of the perspective current whilst retaining the maximum permissible disconnection time for the circuit. This reduces the risk of fire for the duration of the fault and is now recommended for fixed electrical installations.

Chapter 44

Protection against voltage disturbances and electromagnetic disturbances

Section 443, which deals with protection against overvoltage’s of atmospheric origin or due to switching, has been redrafted.

The AQ criteria (conditions of external influence for lightning) for determining if protection against transient overvoltages is needed are no longer included in BS 7671. In its place, protection against transient overvoltages has to be provided where the consequence caused by overvoltage. In other instances, a risk assessment needs to be undertaken to decide if the protection is required.

These section mainly sees changes for the electrical design, commercial and industrial electricians. There are no major changes for general domestic installations.

Chapter 46

Devices for isolation and switching

A new chapter has been introduced which focuses on non-automatic local and remote isolation and switching measures for the prevention or removal of dangers associated with electrical installations or electrically powered equipment. Also, switching for the control of circuits or equipment. Where electrically powered equipment is within the scope of BS EN 60204, only the requirements of that standard apply.

Chapter 53

Protection, isolation, switching, control and monitoring

Chapter 52 has been adjusted to concentrate on requirements for protection, isolation, switching, control and monitoring dealing with requirements for selection and erection of devices provided to manage such functions.

Section 534

Devices for protection against overvoltage

This section has been revised with key changes to the selection of overvoltage protection devices.

Chapter 54

Earthing arrangements and protective conductors

This section has introduced two new regulations stating there’s a strong recommendation to install a foundation earth electrode on new buildings.

Chapter 55 

Other equipment

When installing luminaires in the ground, consideration must be given to the tables and standards highlighted in chapter 55.

• Ground-recessed luminaires, the selection and erection of which shall take account of the guidance given in Table A.1 of BS EN 60598-2-13.

Part 6

Inspection and testing

No major changes except for restructure of chapters.

Section 722 Electric vehicle charging installations

The main change in this section is to Regulation 722.411.4.1 which highlights the use of a PME supply with regards to vehicle charging installations. This means PME cannot be used unless you meet (i) (ii) (iii) of 722.411.4.1.

Part 8

Energy efficiency

The 18th Edition does see a whole new section which deals with Sustainability. This is mainly aimed at electrical design.

Overall there are some significant changes coming with the 18th Edition which will impact electricians on site. With the mains points consisting of: protecting against electric shock, protecting against electromagnetic disturbances and voltage disturbance and selection, erection of wiring systems and of course the introduction of energy efficiency.  So this is more than a small amendment or update, and as such electricians will need to update to the latest version of the 18th edition wiring regulations in the coming year. We already have lots of 18th edition course dates live to book online.

Categories: 18th edition

Case Study - Michael Williams

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 20th February 2018

 

Name: 

Michael Williams

Course: 

2365 Level 2 & 3

What was your job before training as an electrician and why did you choose the electrical trade?

Before, I ran my own powder coating company. I had grown tired of having unreliable staff and being forced to work excessive amounts of hours in order to meet unrealistic deadlines for demanding customers. I wanted to find a career where I could work on my own and be able to properly plan my workload.

I already had an interest in electronics from school and I've always been fascinated by cutting edge technologies. Adding all these elements together, training as an electrician seemed like the perfect solution.

Why did you take the 2365 Level 2 & 3?

It offered the most comprehensive training for someone wanting to enter into the electrical industry without going through the apprenticeship route.

What did you enjoy most about the course?

I really enjoyed learning all the theory and reasoning behind electrical installations. Knowing why things are done a certain way meant that I started to see the everyday world in a different light. We had a great tutor in Adam Ormesher, who really engaged with the whole class and kept the content interesting throughout.

What did you find most challenging?

Definitely the lighting circuits in the practical! There are so many different ways to wire them up that I often got a bit lost.

Can you tell us what you’re doing now?

I have started up on my own as an electrician. I am mostly sub-contracting to other, well established firms in order to build up my practical experience, but I do get the odd offer of my own work through friends and family.

What are your future plans to grow your business?

I have already returned to Trade Skills 4U and taken the PAT testing qualification. I will be back again for the inspection and testing course, the electric car charging point and the 18th edition course (when it is released). I want to arm myself with as much knowledge as possible so I am able to take on whatever work is offered to me.

What advice would you give to someone looking at training to become an electrician?

Work hard. Sometimes you may not grasp part of it straight away, but if you ask for help and stick with it, it will all make sense eventually. It is a really satisfying career choice, seeing a project through from beginning to end (no matter what it is) and having a pleased and grateful customer at the end of the day is a brilliant feeling.

Why did you choose TS4U?

Their training structure of 2 weeks on the course then the following 2 weeks back at home suited me perfectly. It allowed me to continue running my company as I trained ultimately leading to me selling it to move in to the electrical industry full time.

 

Thank you Michael for taking the time to tell us about your experience, we wish you luck in building your career as an electrician. 

Categories: qualification, employment, case study, electrician, trade

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