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Case Study Kenny Whittle

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 24th May 2018

 

Course: 2365 Level 2 & 3

1. What did you do before you started training to be an electrician?

Before training at Trade Skills 4U, I worked in asset management. 

2. What was your reason for training?

I chose to train as an electrician because I had grown tired with working in an office environment and travelling to the same place of work day after day. I wanted abit more variety.

3. Why did you choose the electrical field?

Before becoming an asset manager, I worked in a factory producing vehicle wiring harnesses, thus, electrical work was the obvious choice. Also, working as an electrician would allow me to work in different locations and earn good money at the sme time so it met my needs.

4. Are you working as an electrician whilst studying?

I started working as an electrician 2 months into my level 2 course, for a company that maintains the electrical systems in a newspaper printers whilst also taking on various other contracts.The 2365 course allowed me to come into the industry and prove useful to the team on day one. I also noticed that as I progressed through the course, I could continue to take on more responsibility and tasks.

5. What do you enjoy most about the course? 

As a fan of science, particularly physics, I enjoyed learning about the theory behind electricity and how to carry out cable calculations.

6. Are you struggling with any of the topics?

So far, I haven't struggled with any of the topics or modules.

7. How would you describe the facilities at TS4U?

TS4U facilities are excellent. At no point did the group lose out due to facilities not being adequate.

8. Do you have any plans to gain more electrical qualifications?

I will use TS4U in the near future to get my inspection and testing certificate. Doing the course, and it being so diverse has made me realise how much I enjoy the theoretical and designing side of the industry. So I am contemplating further qualifications in that field.

9. What advice would you give to others thinking of taking the 2365?

Just sign up and change your life for the better. The course is over before you know it and then you are away. I am disappointed with myself I didn't do it sooner.

10. What are your plans for the future?

I will spend a few years on the tools as was my initial reason for starting the course, but eventually I would like to go into designing installations and perhaps teaching later on.

Categories: case study, qualifications, electrician, trade

New Yorkshire Facility Opens with Great Success!

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 11th May 2018

On Wednesday 9th May, we officially opened our brand new Yorkshire facility on Hawthorne Park, East Leeds. The event opened with an inspirational speech from CEO Carl Bennett, who spoke about his journey to forming Trade Skills 4U in 2005 and the reasons he did so at the age of 40. Carl continued to speak about the positive impacts electrical training courses can have on people’s lives and the excellent company values we possess.

After Carl finished his speech, we heard from Leeds City Councillor Mohammed Rafique the Executive Member for Employment, Enterprise and Opportunity. Mohammed gave a warm welcome to the new centre, and stated how excited he was to introduce us to the city and regional area. He went on to mention the rate and speed Yorkshire is growing and how there is a great need for electricians and fellow tradesman in the area. He also said these newly skilled people will contribute greatly to the region.

Councillor Rafique finished by thanking us for investing in the city and said that he is looking forward to hearing about the progress students make at the centre going forward.

 

Click below to watch the video:

 

 

Once the speeches had finished, guests were invited to explore the centre and speak with tutors and staff about the various courses available. Others ventured outside to watch the Tesla car do its dance! Or have a go on the power tools supplied by Hitachi. Quest electrical wholesalers were also in attendance to speak to those who needed any advice. 

Inside the building there was a chance to win a KT63 by completing the giant Buzz-wire in the fastest time. The quickest time we recorded was an incredibly fast 35 seconds by Haider Nawaz, so a tester will be on its way to him soon! 

Throughout the afternoon there were various seminars and interactive sessions taking place that our guests were welcome to join. These included an 18th Edition Preview, Electric Vehicle charging seminar hosted by Rolec and an interactive practical and Interactive Science session. 

We are extremely happy that the day ran very smoothly and hope that our guests enjoyed the activities on offer and free food supplied by KK Catering Ltd. We’d like to give a massive thank you to everyone who attended and we hope to see you back in the centre very soon. We’re very excited for the new courses to begin on the 14th May 2018 and wish all prospective students the very best.

If you would like to visit the centre for a tour or to and speak to a tutor please contact us on: 0800 856 4448 alternatively, if you are interested in booking a course, please Click here for a full list of courses on offer at the new Yorkshire facility.

Categories: yorkshire, leeds, training, electrician

Case Study - Libby Rush

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 27th March 2018

 

Name: Libby Rush

Course: Bronze + PAT

Libby is studying Engineering at university and decided to come to Trade Skills 4U to gain some more hands on experience. Here, she discusses how she found the course and why more women should enter the trade.

1. What is your reason for training?

I'm training as part of my graduate engineering scheme to improve my practical skills and become more familiar with building and wiring regulations.

2. Tell us why you decided to train as an electrican?

My employer has sent me to this course because at university I had very little hands on experience, since traditional education has a very heavy focus on science and design theory. This scheme puts that theory into the context of the real world and demonstrates the additional considerations needed to successfully design a circuit.

3. How long have you been working in the electrical industry?

I graduated from a 4 year university course in 2017 and have been in my role for 6 months.

4. Tell us about your current job? 

I am a graduate control, electrical and instrumentation engineer so my day to day includes a lot of computer based design. As part of the development programme I will be moving around different departments so I can learn more about how they work.

5. Why did you decide to take the Bronze course?

My employer has sent previous employees to Trade Skills 4U and received really positive feedback about the scheme so they've to incorporated it into the graduate development programme. 

6. Tell us about your experience with TS4U?

My experience at trade skills 4u has been absolutely fantastic, the support available for people like me with little knowledge in the subject was incredible. All the staff I've found to be really approachable as well as professional.

7. What did you enjoy most about the course?

The interactive way the courses were taught which allowed for back and forth of questions was a great way to build a rapport with the instructor and create a more comfortable learning environment. Teaching theory along side the practical elements also really helped me relate what we were doing in the workrooms to something I knew about.

8. What did you find most challenging about the course?

Jumping in day one into a pure practical exercise was challenging for me whilst other students were really in their element. It was the first time I got hand cramp outside of an exam, trying to keep up with everyone else.

9. Do you have any advice for women who are thinking of entering the trade?

I recommend finding a balance between powering through on your own and knowing when to ask for help. Working together and talking through problems is one of the best ways to learn and also break the ice, but don't be afraid to say no and that you want to do it by yourself. Ultimately, if someone else is over your shoulder and offering to tweak your work it won't benefit anyone in the long run.

10. Do you think there’s plenty of opportunities for those working in the electrical industry?

I've found a lot of opportunities within my area when I was looking for training schemes. It's such a vast industry there are so many levels to jump in on.

We wish Libby the best of luck with the rest of her training and new job!

Categories: case study, qualification, electrician, trade

18th Edition Wiring Regulations - Major Shift or Update?

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 13th March 2018

The new 18th Edition is due to be launched in July this year with changes coming into effect in January 2019. We’ve taken a look to see if there are any significant modifications to the 17th or if they are more like updates to be aware of.

Before we get into the nitty gritty of the regulations, there’s notable changes to the structure and layout of the book. Sparks used to have to navigate through the book by using a fragmented, sectioned based multiple contents guide, which most people didn’t find very user friendly. Now the book has a much larger contents section which has been formatted for a more holistic approach. This should now make it easier for electricians to navigate their way through the book to find the regulation they require.

We’ve taken a look through the regulations and highlighted what we think has changed in the new 18th Edition.   

Part 1

There’s only minor changes in part 1, these are slight amendments on information on electrical installation certificate.

Part 2

Chapter 41 – There are a number of significant changes taking place under this section. We’ve highlighted the two we think are most noteworthy.

• Regulation 411.3.3 has been revised and now applies to socket-outlets with a rated current not exceeding 32A. There is an exception to omit RCD protection where, other than a dwelling, a documented risk assessment determines that RCD protection is not necessary.

• A new Regulation 411.3.4 requires that, within domestic (household) premises, additional protection by an RCD with a rated residual operating current not exceeding 30 mA shall be provided for AC final circuits supplying luminaires.

Main changes include further use of RCD’s for domestic households. Including RCD protection for all lighting circuits and socket outlets rated up to 32A when previously 20A.

It’s important to note for domestic properties the regulation has been deleted that allows the use of RCD protection for a single socket outlet to be omitted as a permitted exception.

Chapter 42

Protection against thermal effects

•  A new Regulation 421.1.7 has been introduced recommending the installation of arc fault detection devices (AFDDs) to mitigate the risk of fire in AC final circuits of a fixed installation due to the effects of arc fault currents.

The main changes in this section includes the use of arc fault protection. These work by detecting a fault at a very early stage, reducing the magnitude of the perspective current whilst retaining the maximum permissible disconnection time for the circuit. This reduces the risk of fire for the duration of the fault and is now recommended for fixed electrical installations.

Chapter 44

Protection against voltage disturbances and electromagnetic disturbances

Section 443, which deals with protection against overvoltage’s of atmospheric origin or due to switching, has been redrafted.

The AQ criteria (conditions of external influence for lightning) for determining if protection against transient overvoltages is needed are no longer included in BS 7671. In its place, protection against transient overvoltages has to be provided where the consequence caused by overvoltage. In other instances, a risk assessment needs to be undertaken to decide if the protection is required.

These section mainly sees changes for the electrical design, commercial and industrial electricians. There are no major changes for general domestic installations.

Chapter 46

Devices for isolation and switching

A new chapter has been introduced which focuses on non-automatic local and remote isolation and switching measures for the prevention or removal of dangers associated with electrical installations or electrically powered equipment. Also, switching for the control of circuits or equipment. Where electrically powered equipment is within the scope of BS EN 60204, only the requirements of that standard apply.

Chapter 53

Protection, isolation, switching, control and monitoring

Chapter 52 has been adjusted to concentrate on requirements for protection, isolation, switching, control and monitoring dealing with requirements for selection and erection of devices provided to manage such functions.

Section 534

Devices for protection against overvoltage

This section has been revised with key changes to the selection of overvoltage protection devices.

Chapter 54

Earthing arrangements and protective conductors

This section has introduced two new regulations stating there’s a strong recommendation to install a foundation earth electrode on new buildings.

Chapter 55 

Other equipment

When installing luminaires in the ground, consideration must be given to the tables and standards highlighted in chapter 55.

• Ground-recessed luminaires, the selection and erection of which shall take account of the guidance given in Table A.1 of BS EN 60598-2-13.

Part 6

Inspection and testing

No major changes except for restructure of chapters.

Section 722 Electric vehicle charging installations

The main change in this section is to Regulation 722.411.4.1 which highlights the use of a PME supply with regards to vehicle charging installations. This means PME cannot be used unless you meet (i) (ii) (iii) of 722.411.4.1.

Part 8

Energy efficiency

The 18th Edition does see a whole new section which deals with Sustainability. This is mainly aimed at electrical design.

Overall there are some significant changes coming with the 18th Edition which will impact electricians on site. With the mains points consisting of: protecting against electric shock, protecting against electromagnetic disturbances and voltage disturbance and selection, erection of wiring systems and of course the introduction of energy efficiency.  So this is more than a small amendment or update, and as such electricians will need to update to the latest version of the 18th edition wiring regulations in the coming year. We already have lots of 18th edition course dates live to book online.

Categories: 18th edition

Case Study - Michael Williams

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 20th February 2018

 

Name: 

Michael Williams

Course: 

2365 Level 2 & 3

What was your job before training as an electrician and why did you choose the electrical trade?

Before, I ran my own powder coating company. I had grown tired of having unreliable staff and being forced to work excessive amounts of hours in order to meet unrealistic deadlines for demanding customers. I wanted to find a career where I could work on my own and be able to properly plan my workload.

I already had an interest in electronics from school and I've always been fascinated by cutting edge technologies. Adding all these elements together, training as an electrician seemed like the perfect solution.

Why did you take the 2365 Level 2 & 3?

It offered the most comprehensive training for someone wanting to enter into the electrical industry without going through the apprenticeship route.

What did you enjoy most about the course?

I really enjoyed learning all the theory and reasoning behind electrical installations. Knowing why things are done a certain way meant that I started to see the everyday world in a different light. We had a great tutor in Adam Ormesher, who really engaged with the whole class and kept the content interesting throughout.

What did you find most challenging?

Definitely the lighting circuits in the practical! There are so many different ways to wire them up that I often got a bit lost.

Can you tell us what you’re doing now?

I have started up on my own as an electrician. I am mostly sub-contracting to other, well established firms in order to build up my practical experience, but I do get the odd offer of my own work through friends and family.

What are your future plans to grow your business?

I have already returned to Trade Skills 4U and taken the PAT testing qualification. I will be back again for the inspection and testing course, the electric car charging point and the 18th edition course (when it is released). I want to arm myself with as much knowledge as possible so I am able to take on whatever work is offered to me.

What advice would you give to someone looking at training to become an electrician?

Work hard. Sometimes you may not grasp part of it straight away, but if you ask for help and stick with it, it will all make sense eventually. It is a really satisfying career choice, seeing a project through from beginning to end (no matter what it is) and having a pleased and grateful customer at the end of the day is a brilliant feeling.

Why did you choose TS4U?

Their training structure of 2 weeks on the course then the following 2 weeks back at home suited me perfectly. It allowed me to continue running my company as I trained ultimately leading to me selling it to move in to the electrical industry full time.

 

Thank you Michael for taking the time to tell us about your experience, we wish you luck in building your career as an electrician. 

Categories: case study, qualification, employment, electrician, trade

2018 Electricians Events Calendar

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 25th January 2018

 

 

Bookmark and share this page for the latest electrical events that are taking place in 2018.

January

 

 

Elex - London

Location: London, Alexandra Palace 

Date: Wednesday 31st - January - Thursday 1st February

About: Elex offers electrical professionals to access the latest technologies and attend various free seminars led by industry experts discussing key issues that face electricians today.

 

February

Tech Talk Seminars

Location: Newcastle, Newcastle Racecourse

Date: Wednesday 7th February

Location: Leeds, Leeds United FC 

Date: Friday 9th February

Location:  Newmarket, Newmarket Racecourse

Date: Tuesday 20th February

Location: Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton Racecourse

Date: Thursday 22nd February

About: Useful and informative half day seminars for those working in the electrical industry.

 

The Green Building & Facilities Roadshow 

Location: Manchester, Ethiad Stadium 

Date: Tuesday 27th February

About: Meet experts and suppliers for the latest cutting edge sustainable building products and solutions.

 

 

March

 

National Apprenticeship Week 

Date: Monday 5th- Friday 9th March

About: The 11th National Apprenticeship Week celebrates the success of apprenticeships and the hard work they do in the workplace. By highlighting their achievements they hope to encourage others to choose the apprenticeship path.

 

 

Ecobuild 

Location: London, Excel Centre

Date: Tuesday 6th - Thursday 8th March

About: Want to know about the latest technology and the freshest ideas? Hear about the government’s commitment to hit global targets and meet with architects, developers to local infrastructure clients.

 

 

Elex - Manchester

Location: Manchester EventCity

Date: Thursday 15th - Friday 16th March

About: Try out the latest products on the market, get the lowdown on the latest regulations and meet with exhibitors from across the country.   

 

April

The National Electrical Vehicle Show

Location: Malvern

Date: Sunday 8th April

About: The event features a range of classic and modern vehicles. There will be plenty of exhibitors as well trade and commercial stalls to browse through. Great event for fans of motors.

 

 

 

 

Elex - Exeter

Location: Exeter, Westpoint

Date: Thursday 19th - Friday 20th April

About: A hands-on event where electricians can try out the latest tools and hear from hundreds of exhibitors.

 

May

 

All-Energy Exhibition & Conference

Location: Glasgow, Sec Glasgow

Date: Wednesday 2nd - Thursday 3rd May

About: The go to event for renewable energy and low carbon innovation. The event will showcase the latest technologies and services for the energy supply chain for both public and private sectors. With over 400 speakers, 300 exhibitors and 12 industry sectors it’s not to be missed.

 

 

June

 

Elex - Harrogate

Location: Harrogate, Great Yorkshire Showground

Date: Wednesday 13th - Thursday 16th June

About: Find the latest tools on the market and get a fantastic discount on various products. You can also hear from exhibitors throughout the course of the two days.

 

July

Nothing in the diary yet

 

August

Nothing to confirm yet

 

September

The Energy Event

Location: Birmingham, NEC

Date: Tuesday 11th - Thursday 13th September

About: The event will be accompanied by The Energy Awards, where companies are celebrated for successfully reducing their emissions.

 

 

 

 

Elex - Coventry

Location: Coventry, Ricoh Arena

Date: Thursday 20th - Friday 21st September

About: Make a huge saving on some of the latest tools on the market and demonstrations from suppliers.

 

 

October

 

The Tool Show

Location: Kempton Park Racecourse

Date: Friday 12th - Saturday 14th October

About: Find the latest tools and grab a bargain at The Tool Show in October. There’s also prizes to be won and masterclasses taking place.

 

 

November

 

Elex - Surrey

Location: Surrey, Sandown Park

Date: Thursday 1st - Friday 2nd November

About: Electricians can get hands-on and try out a number of tools displayed by a large number of exhibitors. Savings can be made on purchases on the day.

 

 

The Electrical Design and Install Expo

Location: Birmingham, NEC

Date: Wednesday 14th - Thursday 15th November

About: The Electrical Design expo showcases various products such as; Platform to Learn More About the Fast Moving Electrical Industry. There’s also exhibitors from the Electronics & Electrical Goods industry. 

 

December

Nothing confirmed yet.

 

Categories: electrician, events, sparkie, exhibits, trade show

Case Study - Josh Smith

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 19th January 2018

 

Name: Josh Smith

Course: 2365 Level 3

Josh, 24 who is close to completing his level 3 2365 City & Guilds qualification, speaks to us about why he chose to become an electrician after leaving the army.

What did you do before training to become an electrician?

I was in the British Army working as a Royal Engineer. I entered the army at 16 years old so I was very young when I joined. After seven years I decided it was time for me to leave and look for new opportunities and gain some life experience elsewhere.

What is your reason for training?

I investigated a few different trades and decided the electrical field was a job that was always going to be needed whatever the weather or season. For example a bricklayer is very seasonal, I never want to be out of work due to external circumstances and I also want a career where people needed me and I didn’t need my employer.

Also, I already have some experience in the electrical trade so this definitely helped me to choose which route to go down. I have a few friends who are electricians and they really recommended it to me, they have trained from apprentice level so I have seen the hard work they put in and knew I could do the same.

Are you currently employed?

Yes, I am an electrical trainee. When I’m not doing my two weeks on the 2365 I am working with them around the North Wales area. The work is mainly in commercial settings so we are visiting schools, retail outlets and large buildings. We are currently working on a rewire at a train station so it’s a big job. I feel like working on site and coming here is so beneficial, I have taken so much knowledge and practical skills from site each week and then into the classroom and vice versa.

Was it easy to find employment?

I applied for the job onsite when I started my first week at Trade Skills 4U and feel they were keen to take me on because I had already taken the initiative to start my qualifications. So on my first two weeks off from the course I started with the company.

Tell us about your training experience with TS4U?

I have really enjoyed training here and would definitely come back to do additional qualifications. The teaching is really in-depth and the tutors are approachable and willing to help with any questions or worries you have.

What is the best and most difficult experience you’ve had?

I feel like the experiences the army have put me through have taught me to drive myself through any situation. It has definitely set me up for learning new challenges which is exactly what this was. It has been a different learning environment but I’ve enjoyed every part of it. I can’t say there’s anything that has proven very difficult.

What are your plans for the future?

I have already enrolled on the NVQ so I will start that near enough as soon as I have finished here. I will also start fulltime work with the company I’m with now when the 2365 is completed.

Do you have any advice for those wanting to train as an electrician?

Research the training providers and try gain some experience in the electrical industry before paying for a course. The electrical field can prove quite complicated for some people so make sure you have the right skillset for the job beforehand. It’s never too late to learn a new trade either, I’m glad I picked Trade Skills 4U as they have demonstrated their knowledge from the get go and the tutors couldn’t have been more helpful.

 

We wish Josh all the best with NVQ and starting fulltime employment. 

 

Categories: 2365, electrician, study

JIB Launch New ECS Check & Registered Electrician System

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 16th January 2018

What is it?

A new checking system has been launched by the Joint Industry Board (JIB) that enables clients and contractors to authenticate the skills of electricians.

The new Electronic Certification Scheme (ECS) Check is an online portal that provides information of an ECS cardholder that is due to work on site. The portal is also a beneficial platform that electrical contractors can utilise to showcase their own staff skills profile during tenders or projects.

 

 

The purpose of the website is to give clients full confidence that projects are being carried out by qualified and professional electrical tradesman. 

Who can register on the scheme?

Currently, eligible ECS cardholders who are qualified to NVQ level 3 and the current BS7671 Wiring Regulations are due to be notified about the opportunity to register to become an ECS Registered Electrician. All those wishing to do so, must enrol to a Code of Professional Practice, which includes a commitment to Continuing Professional Development. 

How do you register?

Existing ECS gold card holders can upgrade their card to include Registered Electrician status. It is also easy to upgrade when you renew your card. All you will need to do is prove you are qualified in the latest wiring regulations as well as sign up to a professional code of conduct.

If you do not currently hold an ECS card you can make an application as normal and the card will be issued.

Visit this here for more information 

Why has the scheme been launched?

One of the main reasons behind the ECS card scheme is down to public perception and contractor’s awareness of untrained and under qualified tradesmen on site. Paying customers and contractors want to know they are dealing with professional electricians who are qualified in the areas they say they are, so the work carried out complies with all health and safety regulations.

They key difference between the normal Gold Card and new Registered Electrician card is the need to hold the latest wiring regulations. As such the new scheme is designed to highlight the fact that the installer is qualified with the latest regulations.

Once a personal card has been issued, an electricians profile will automatically be updated on the ECS Check for contractors and customers to view. The intention is to build a national database or qualified electricians which can be easily verified online.

How can you check if an electrician is registered?

If employers want to utilise the site, they can use the Employer Portal to find out if an individual is registered. They should also be able to use the employer portal to allocate skilled electricians to specific jobs.  This can be crucial for an electrical company because until now, a client has never been able to visibly access the make-up of a workforce. 

Another added benefit for both an employer and client is that whilst a job is taking place, both can access Real Time information from site access as well as audits.

Ultimately, the new ECS Check system is an added bonus to the ECS Card. Once you have completed the full application process and entered your full information onto the MyECS profile you will have a tangible card and you will automatically be linked to the online portal which customers and clients can view. If you’re an employer there seems to be more to utilise on the system in terms of applying for contracts and going through the tender process with clients, then there’s the added ability to view jobs during the Real Time process. 

The new service has been rolled out across England, Wales and Northern Ireland, for more information on ECS Check visit here.

If you’re an electrician and want an ECS Card, the price is from £60 upwards and can be purchase online.

Categories: electrician, card, system, ecs

Are Electricians Jobs Safe from Robots?

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 5th January 2018

As technology constantly evolves, and Artificial Intelligence (AI) becomes more advanced, there’s the risk of robots potentially taking human jobs.

Discussions have been taking place to establish whether people will lose their jobs in the future and which professions are most likely to be affected. It was reported from a study undertaken by McKinsey & Company that about 30% of tasks in 60% of occupations could be carried out by robots and labour jobs could be most affected. There’s a possibility that routine-physical jobs will initially take the hardest hit including; cleaning, automotive, waitressing, manufacturing and warehouse jobs. Places such as Mac Donald’s have already adopted an automated kiosk approach that takes customers’ orders, cutting out all human contact.  There’s divided opinion on whether AI will eventually takeover more intellectual jobs such as administration or financial roles and how quick this will happen.

Bricklaying Robots are here already

New York based company, Construction Robotics, has already created a bricklaying robot called SAM (Semi-Automated Mason) who can lay 3000 bricks a day, in comparison to builder who can lay an average of 500 bricks a day. Similarly, Australia has introduced a largescale bricklaying robot which can lay 1000 bricks an hour and could build approximately 150 homes a year. At this moment in time, there are set-backs for using these machines, SAM cannot deal with corners and the machine setup is timely which can delay the onsite process, SAM also needs human assistance to fully complete its bricklaying task.

Introducing new machinery like SAM poses a serious threat to builders working onsite, even though they require some human assistance thousands could lose their jobs once these machines are used onsite.

Modular Homes

Another potential threat to tradesmen is the increase of prefabricated homes. The UK has seen a steady growth in people opting for a prefab home as it gives them the opportunity to create and design their own home without the lengthy and complex building process they can also save a lot of money in comparison to buying a home. The latest prefab homes are hard-wearing with the exterior being built in three to four days. This means electricians will have to adapt their job role slightly. Instead of conducting a full installation, an electrician will have to test, certify and connect the main points of the electrics within the home to the land. They may also be required to work within the factory making sure the electrics are all installed correctly. Currently, when purchasing a prefab home, the company specify the customer will have to use their employees to fully set-up home, if the popularity of these homes increases this may change in the future.

Supporters of prefab homes partially blame the shortage of skilled labour for the increase of modular houses. The rapid retirement rate of UK construction workers, has meant housebuilding companies have had to embrace new building techniques. Along with the introduction of virtual construction software being integrated into the production line process means the construction industry is ready for a big change.

What jobs are safe from AI?

There are jobs which will remain safe from the evolution of AI, jobs that requires a lot of dexterity, hand-eye coordination and flexibility. Skilled trade jobs such as electricians will remain safe due to the varying challenges in different environments, which will prove difficult for machines. Jobs that require empathy and creativity will also remain safe, these include; nurses, teachers, designers.

Optimists also believe that although AI may initially create employment loss, in the long run it will create higher employment rates. What a machine takes away will also give back with new industries and entirely new job roles, these fields include; computing, data science and engineering. They also believe robots will eventually enhance the productivity of job roles as they will work alongside electricians and teachers helping with more tasks including checking homework or assisting onsite.

The speed in which the changes will happen differ when considering the high financial cost of inventing and introducing new technology as well as the public adopting to a life with less human interaction.

 

Categories: electrician, artificial intelligence, robots, trade

Chris Beckley Case Study

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 12th December 2017

Chris Beckley

 

Name: Chris Beckley

Course: Level 3 2365

What was your job before training as an electrician?

I've had several jobs but before I decided to train as an electrician I worked as a Department Manager of a debt management company.

Why did you decide to train as an electrician?

I fancied a change and began to dislike the office life. I decided to do more with the skills I have in being a strong mathematician and fairly good at DIY. When I looked up the skills you need to be an electrician it seemed I had the right qualities to complement the job.

How long did it take you to find employment after completing the course?

I was fortunate because it didn't take me very long. I was in employment about three weeks after completing the course.

What job are doing now?

I am currently a highways electrician working on the M60 motorway, I have been doing this for six months now.

What did you enjoy the most about the course?

The things I enjoyed most about the course was the friendly and supportive atmosphere of the group and of the course teacher Adam from Birchwood. I also really enjoyed getting to grips with the practical side of things and actually seeing my progress week by week. The theory side of the course didn't bother me that much but I definitely preferred getting hands on and doing the practicals. 

How would you describe the facilities at TS4U?

Excellent, we never struggled for the equipment we required and the centre is in great condition.

Do you have any plans to gain anymore qualifications?

I am definitely considering doing the 2391 inspection and testing. I want to be a well rounded electrician and now that I am working on site I would have a better understanding of the inspection and testing course. I am really keen on developing my skills and knowledge further in the electrical industry, so I will go on to complete my NVQ level 3 and then progress onto the Level 4 electrical design. I want to keep learning about as much of the trade as I can.

What advice would you give to others thinking of training to become an electrician?

I would say it is the best decision I made and I wouldn't look back. I think the best advice is to look at what skillset you already possess and decide if it’s suitable, if you're willing to put the hard work in then absolutely go for it. I would highly recommend the course I did at Trade Skills 4U as a training provider due to how in-depth the courses are and how much you learn.

Categories: case study, 2365, electrician

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