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EV Charging Point Installation – What’s the big deal?

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 29th May 2019

EV charging and grants seminar

This year we introduced a range of seminars designed to help those working in the industry maximise the opportunities out there, and to share information about how EV charging point grants can be accessed and how installers can register with OLEV.

The first EV seminars have now been run, and the feedback so far is that they were engaging and informative. We have provided an outline of the information presented below.

How the funding works

The Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) is a government initiative which has been introduced to support the early market of electric and ultra-low emission vehicles by introducing a number of grant funding Initiatives.

An electric vehicle is eligible if it appears on the OLEV eligibility list. You can view the full list of eligible vehicles here. Please note that from 1st July 2019, all chargepoints installed under the EV Homecharge Scheme must be smart. We will update you with more info nearer the time.

If you would like to find out more about how these grants work, and who can apply for them please click here. Alternatively, please register to attend one of our seminars (see info below), which aim to demystify how these grants and funding work. There are two schemes available:

EV Homecharge Scheme - EVHS
This scheme is specifically for the domestic home installation market. Its aim is to provide affordable domestic EV chargers with a value of 75% (the grant is capped at a maximum of £500 per charging unit), which is subsidised by the Government Grant. When you complete the work the customer will pay you the balance of the cost and then you apply to OLEV to receive the remainder of the install costs directly.

Eligible expenditure include:

Cost of unit

Electrical components

Civil engineering works

Labour costs (for installation)

Hardware costs

VAT incurred by the customer

Site survey works (when leading to a completed installation)

Workplace Charging Scheme – WCS
This scheme is specifically for the workplace market, but not public areas such as retail parks, unless it is for employee use only. The grant allows businesses to purchase up to 20 EV charging points, at a subsidised cost, with each 2-way charge unit having a £1,000 price reduction (£500 per socket).

With this scheme the business requiring the charging points starts the application process. The chosen installer then surveys the site and confirms whether it is suitable for installations. Once the installation is complete the installer has to complete an online grant redemption via the OLEV portal, after which a grant level is confirmed, and the installer can receive the grant.

Q&A

At the end of the seminars we give attendees an opportunity of ask questions, of which some have been answered below

Q. Do you need to register with each manufacturer to install each type of unit?
A. Yes, each manufacturer requires you to be an approved installer. However, your C&G qualification will be considered proof of your competence as an installer.

Q. How long after submitting the paperwork do you receive the grant / payment?
A. Payments can take up to 6 weeks

Q. What’s the average cost of an install?
A. This varies greatly, however from talking to installers we estimate that as a guide you could earn between £200 to £300 per install. This of course could be higher depending on the complexity of the job.

Q. How much will the new smart points cost?
A. Prices will be published in July, however we will update you on this as soon as we have the information.

Q. Can you claim 2 grants on 1 property?
A. Yes, you can. The grant is obtained on the car rather than the property, though there is a cap of two grants per household.

Q. As an approved installer, can you buy charging points direct from Rolec?
A. Unfortunately not. While Rolec are the manufacturer, you will still need to purchase these from your local wholesaler.

Q. Do you need to buy a Rolec tester to register on the Rolec scheme?
A. Yes you will need a Rolec Charge Check, however any MFT is ok for the usual Inspection and Testing.

How to get registered to draw down the funding

Only authorised installers are able to claim the grant on behalf of the domestic customer. When you pass any of our EV courses you will be able to register on Rolec’s approved installer’s s scheme where your details will then appear on their national database of installers. Once approved by Rolec you will then receive an OLEV Scheme Number which is essential to draw down any funding.

How do I get qualified?

To take advantage of the opportunities available in this high growth industry, now is a great time to get yourself qualified to become a specialist and Certified EV Charging Point Installer.

We offer three EV Charging Point training courses, which we run in partnership with Rolec. These include :

C&G 2919-01 Electric Car / Vehicle Charging Point Installers Course - A 2 day course designed for fully qualified electricians and installers. The course is intended for those looking to enhance their current skillset to allow them to install domestic, commercial and ‘on street’ vehicle charging points.

C&G 2919-02 Domestic EV Charging Point Installers Course – A 4 day course designed for Domestic Installers wishing to upgrade their knowledge and learn how to install, fault find and inspect and test domestic car charging points.

Blue: Domestic EV Car Charging Point Installers Package - A 22 day course designed for those new to the industry, or in a similar trade, who wish to carry out both domestic installations and offer a standalone domestic car charging point installation service. The new 18th Edition course is also included in this package.

Creating an extra revenue stream

Taking into account the increasing demand, we believe that now is the best time to get qualified in this exciting sector. The figures suggest this service is going to be in high demand, so arming yourself with this additional skill can future proof your earning potential, making it a great investment in your business.

It’s estimated that by 2030 50% of vehicles produced will be either electric or plug-in hybrid. Again this is great news for anyone looking to add EV charging point installation as an additional skill to boost their revenue stream

Categories: ev charging points, ev, electricians, olev, ev seminar, ev installer, electric vehicle, ev grants

More electricians needed to satisfy new technology skills demand

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 2nd May 2019

The Electrotechnical Skills Partnership (TESP) co-funded by the National Electrotechnical Training (NET) have recently released the findings of the 2019 Labour Market Intelligence report. The report gives an overview of the electrotechnical sector and the skills required to work in the sector at present and in the future.

TESP, a not-for-profit industry partnership, was put together by the Joint Industry Board (JIB), ECA, National Electrotechnical Training (NET), Unite the Union and SELECT. The partnership was created to support electrotechnical employers in order to develop and drive the industry’s skills agenda.

Concerns expressed about bridging the skills gap

The research, undertaken by Pye Tait Consulting, expressed concerns about the sectors ability to attract enough high quality new entrants into the industry to bridge the skills gap. Approximately 450 electrotechnical organisations with 19,000 employees were contacted and their findings suggest the UK will need an additional 8,500 to 10,000 electricians and 4,000 to 5,000 new apprentices over the next five years to satisfy forecasted growth.

The predicted skills increase in the sector is being driven by future and emerging technologies such as SMART technology, Wi-Fi and EV technology, as well as changes to regulations (18th edition) and public policy in areas such as fire safety and energy efficiency.

Employers believe that skilled electricians will need to do additional specialist training to evolve their knowledge and skills in-line with these new technologies. However, the following core technical skills are still perceived to be of the highest need across the sector:

Electrical installation

Electrical maintenance and repairs

Risk management and health and safety

Those Employers that were interviewed said that more must to be done to address the need for professional development of existing workers but to also encourage more electricians into the industry. Currently there are insufficient numbers of apprentices being recruited each year to meet the projected demands and even if an additional 5,000 new apprentices qualified by 2023 there would still be a skills shortfall by as many as 7,500 to 10,000 electricians.

Employers believe better recruitment can be achieved through increased industry engagement with schools and colleges and through other routes into the industry, for example those looking for a career change.

An ageing workforce and difficulties recruiting younger people puts further pressure on the sector

At present the majority of the UK’s workforce is between the age of 25 and 49 with only 15% being under 25 in England and Wales and 24% in Northern Ireland and Scotland.

An industry action plan is now in development by TESP to address the issues and recommendations raised in the report. Activity has already started to forge closer ties between industry and schools and colleges as well as activities promoting industry-recognised qualifications and the development of new careers resources. The action plan will also address how to better support small and micro businesses in the industry, as well as sole traders.

Ruth Devine, chair of TESP and managing director of SJD Electrical, said: “The TESP survey – the first of its kind in over a decade – offers not only a useful snapshot of where the electrotechnical industry and its skills-base are now but also a vital insight into the scale of the challenges we face in the immediate future. The organisations which form TESP all have a crucial part to play in shaping and coordinating the industry’s response to these challenges, and the priorities for action defined in the survey report represent an important first step. Future success will, however, also hinge on the active participation and support of other stakeholders, including Government departments and agencies, clients, training providers, other sector bodies and of course individual businesses – especially the small and micro businesses who make up our industry’s core.”

The report, which is the first in the last 10 years, provides in-depth analysis of the skills needed in the electrotechnical sector. It reinforces our belief that now, more than ever, is a great time to train in this exciting industry to carve out a career which has plenty of opportunities available to those that want to learn.

If you are interested in finding out about the courses we offer please visit our course finder page our simply view all our electrical courses. Alternatively please call to speak to a Course Adviser on 0800 856 4448, who will be happy to help.

Categories: electricians, labour market intelligence report, technology skills demand, jib, skills gap, tesp

What is the 18th Edition and why is it important?

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 2nd May 2019

The 18th Edition is the term commonly used in the industry when referring to the latest British Standards BS 7671:2018 Requirements for Electrical Installations, IET Wiring Regulations.

You may also hear it referred to as:

Wiring Regs

The Regs

18th Edition wiring regs

BS 7671

What is the 18th Edition?

The IET Wiring Regulations is a British standard for the installation of electrical wiring and is considered to be one of the most important documents for electricians in the UK. The regulations apply to the design, erection and verification of electrical installations, plus additions and alterations to existing installations. As such the Wiring Regulations is an essential publication for all professionals working in the electrotechnical engineering services industry.

The 18th Edition Wiring Regulations (BS 7671:2018), written by the IET (The Institution of Engineering and Technology) and the Standards Policy and Strategy Committee, was published in July 2018, and came into effect in January 2019. This replaces the 17th Edition, which was first published in 2008 and updated in 2015, and includes changes such as new and revised regulations, new chapters and restructured sections.

You might be surprised to hear that the first document was published in 1882, and has since been updated on a regular basis to reflect new developments and best practice.

You might also be surprised to learn that the BS 7671 isn’t a legal document in itself. It does, however, contain the guidelines and processes by which all electrical installations must adhere in order to comply with the legal requirements of the Electricity at Work Regulations. Therefore, it is treated in a similar way and is widely recognised in the industry as an authority.

Who needs the 18th Edition?

If you work in electrical installation you will need to make sure that you are designing and installing to the latest regulations to ensure the protection of persons, livestock and property, as well as the proper function of electrical installations.

Why do I need to know about the 18th Edition?

If you work on electrical installations in the UK then you need to know about the BS 7671 as this applies to the wiring installation you will be working on.

If you don’t have the 18th Edition, or don’t know what the regulations include, your installations may not meet the current standard, which could mean that your installations are unsafe or inefficient.

The IET Wiring Regulations is an extremely detailed book (referred to by some as the ‘big blue book’). It is accepted that most people won’t memorise it from front to back, and that’s Ok as no one would expect this. However, what you are required to be is fully aware of its contents and to understand how to reference them and relate them to specific situations.

What you will need, if you want to work in this industry is the 18th Edition qualification. You will also find that when looking to register as a domestic installer on a competent persons scheme, you will need to prove you are up-to-date with the latest qualification even if you have previously completed a Level 3 NVQ. You will also find that when looking to register with the new ECS Check System it is a requirement that you hold this qualification.

If you don’t have this qualification you may find it hard to secure work with large companies and agencies, as they may require that electricians working for them have this qualification as a minimum.

Please be aware that by holding the 18th edition qualification does not mean you are qualified to work as an electrician.

What are the key changes in the 18th Edition?

Examples of some of the significant changes in the 18th Edition are listed below:

Protection against electric shock – Chapter 41 (Section 411 contains a number of significant changes)

Metallic pipes entering the building

The maximum disconnection times for some final circuits.

Regulation 411.3.3 has been revised and now applies to socket-outlets with a rated current not exceeding 32A.

A new Regulation 411.3.4 requires that, within domestic (household) premises, additional protection by an RCD shall be provided for AC final circuits supplying luminaires.

Protection against thermal effects - Chapter 42
A new Regulation 421.1.7 has been introduced recommending the installation of Arc Fault Detection Devices (AFDDs) to mitigate the risk of fire in AC final circuits of a fixed installation due to the effects of arc fault currents.

Selection and erection of wiring systems - Chapter 52
This is a significant change. Regulation 521.10.202 requires cables to be adequately supported against their premature collapse in the event of a fire and applies throughout the installation, not just in escape routes as previously.

Electric vehicle charging installations - Section 722
This section contains significant changes to Regulation 722.411.4.1 concerning the use of a PME supply. Changes have been made to requirements for external influences, RCDs, socket outlets and connectors.

Energy efficiency – Appendix 17
This is a new appendix that provides recommendations for the design and erection of electrical installations.

What course options are available?

Here at TS4U we offer a full 3 day full 18th Edition course as well as 1 day update options for those who have recently achieved their 17th Edition, 3rd amendment. We also offer weekend options and online courses. You can view the full list of our 18th Edition course options on this page.

The 18th Edition course is essential for all electricians working in the UK and training is highly recommended to ensure that all installers have a thorough understanding of the new regulations. The 18th Edition is also one of the most recognised qualifications by employers.

Holding this qualification could be an indication of a person’s commitment to ensuring good practice within the industry.

This course isn’t only appropriate for practicing electricians and domestic installers, it’s also popular with allied professionals, such as electrical engineers, contracts managers, consultants, designers, surveyors. It is also popular with those working in other related trades who need to update and enhance their understanding of the IET Wiring Regulations.

If you are interested in finding out about the other courses we offer please visit our course finder page, alternatively please speak to a Course Adviser on 0800 856 4448, who will be happy to help.

Categories: wiring regs, wiring regulations, 18th edition, bs 7671, iet wiring regulations