We use cookies to deliver the best experience possible. By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our Cookie Policy.

Courses For Adults, Contractors & Companies

Call 0800 856 4448 or 03330 123 123

Course FinderNew EntrantsDomesticCommercialRenewablesContractor
Back

Search

BackAll Electrical Courses

If you want a career in the electrical industry then you're going to need to access high quality training - delivered by professionals in an intensive, structured and focused way.                                                   Unsure where to start? Use our course advisor to help point you in the right direction.  

Course finder
Pay now

Farewell 17th Edition, Hello 18th Edition

Posted by Elaine Hammond on 3rd July 2018

farewell 17th edition

As many of you will already know, on the 1st July 2018 we said goodbye to the 17th edition wiring regulations to make way for the 18th Edition. The C&G 2382-15 17th Edition course has now been replaced by the 2382-18 18th Edition course. So we thought we would take a quick look at the 17th edition and some key talking points.

IET Wiring Regulations Explained

The IET Wiring Regulations is essentially a set of guides that electrical contractors comply with, whether it be for domestic, commercial or industrial installations.

Every professional electrician and domestic installer work to the latest edition of the wiring regulations and will need this if they want to register or remain as a domestic installer with a competent person’s scheme.

Did you know that the wiring regulations were originally published by in 1882?

In fact, there have been requirements for safe electrical wiring since way back in 1876. However, it wasn’t until 1882 that the then Society of Telegraph Engineers and Electricians, who later became the Institution of Electrical Engineers (IEE), which now forms part of the IET, published the ‘Rules and Regulations for the Prevention of Fire Risks arising from Electric Lighting’. The original document consisted of just 4 pages!

The history of the 17th Edition

In January 2008 BS 7671:2008 17th Edition was released, followed by its first Amendment 1 in 2011. The next Amendment 2 came into effect in 2013, followed in January 2015 by the final Amendment 3.

When Amendment 3 was released it included some significant changes; one being Chapter 41, which was introduced to improve the level of protection against electrical shock. It stated that 30 mA RCDs will be required for socket outlets that are for use by ordinary persons and are intended for general use.

Another major change was Regulation 421.1.201 which required consumer units and similar switchgear assemblies in domestic premises to have a non-combustible enclosure or be enclosed in a cabinet or enclosure constructed of non-combustible material and complying with Regulation 132.12.

Regulation 521.11.201 was also a major change which required that wiring systems within escape routes require a suitable fire resistant means of support so that they are not liable to premature collapse in the event of fire.

Other changes included the electrical condition report section, new requirements for mobile and transportable electrical units and changes for the installation of luminaires and light fittings and sections relating to microgeneration and solar photovoltaic systems.

Hello 18th Edition

Whilst it’s time to say goodbye the 17th edition we can now say hello to the new 2382-18 18th Edition courses, which we will be delivering in centres nationwide from July 2018.

We appreciate that whilst changes are not always welcome in all sectors, the new regulations are a major step forward to improving the safety and protection of property as well as enhancing areas like electric vehicle charging, which will be in huge demand over the next few years.

The IET urges that all electrical professionals ensure they are familiar with the new requirements as all installations designed after the 31st December 2018 are to comply with BS 7671:2018.

We believe that scheme providers will be asking their members to hold the new edition although we do believe that existing members will be given some flexibility.

To help you get ready for the changes, we recently reviewed the 18th Edition and identified some of the key changes that you need to be aware of. To find out more please click on the link 18th Edition Wiring Regulations - Major Shift or Update?

However, at a glance below is a list of the main changes to be aware of:

Part 1 Scope, object and fundamental principles

Part 2 Definitions

Chapter 41 Protection against electric shock

Chapter 42 Protection against thermal effects

Chapter 44 Protection against voltage disturbances and electromagnetic disturbances

Chapter 46 Devices for isolation and switching - A new Chapter 46 has been introduced.

Appendices

The following main changes have been made within the appendices

Appendix 1 British Standards to which reference is made in the Regulations includes minor changes, and additions.

Appendix 3 Time/current characteristics of overcurrent protective devices and RCDs

Appendix 6 Model forms for certification and reporting

Appendix 7 (informative) Harmonized cable core colours

Appendix 8 Current-carrying capacity and voltage drop

Appendix 14 Determination of prospective fault current

Appendix 17 Energy efficiency

For more detailed information please visit the IET’s website.

City & Guilds 2382-18 3 Day 18th Edition Course

The 18th Edition course will in fact be very similar to the 17th edition to ensure that you are up-to-date with the latest industry regulations on wiring and the safe use and operation of electrical equipment and systems.

The following subjects are still included:

Scope, object and fundamental principles

Definitions

Assessment of general characteristics

Protection for safety

Selection and erection of equipment

Inspection and testing

Special installations or locations

Appendices

The expected changes are:

Protection against over voltages - Clause 443 is likely to be overhauled.

Protection against fire - Chapter 42 will be updated with extra information on arc fault detection

Electrical Embedded heating - Section 753 will be extended to include embedded electrical heating systems for surface heating, and will include de-icing and frost prevention systems.

Energy efficiency – this will be a brand new section

C&G 2382-18 1 Day 18th Edition Update Course

If you passed the 17th edition with the 3rd amendment since the 1st January 2015 you only need to take the shorter one day 18th Edition Update course. The course covers similar topics to the three day course, as listed above, however as there are fewer changes to cover it can be complete in a shorter time.

Courses delivered in 8 Centres Nationwide

Due to high demand, both of these courses are available from 8 centres nationwide:

Gatwick - covering South London, Kent, Sussex and Surrey

Warrington - covering Manchester, Liverpool, Bolton and the North West

Leeds – covering the North East, Sheffield, Harrogate and York

Central London - right next to Euston Station

Coventry - covering Birmingham, Leicester, Northampton & Midlands

Hertfordshire - covering North London, Herts, Bucks and Essex

Cardiff - covering Wales and South West

Durham CCC (North East) - covering Newcastle, Sunderland and the North East

You can rest assured that the training you receive from Trade Skills 4U is delivered by experienced tutors who have worked in the industry. We are also able to boast, that our pass rate for the 2382 qualification is over 98%, which is well above the national average, and we have no reason to believe that this will change with the new qualification.

Categories: wiring regulations, 17th edition, 18th edition

18th Edition Wiring Regulations - Major Shift or Update?

Posted by Michaela Elcoat on 13th March 2018

The new 18th Edition is due to be launched in July this year with changes coming into effect in January 2019. We’ve taken a look to see if there are any significant modifications to the 17th or if they are more like updates to be aware of.

Before we get into the nitty gritty of the regulations, there’s notable changes to the structure and layout of the book. Sparks used to have to navigate through the book by using a fragmented, sectioned based multiple contents guide, which most people didn’t find very user friendly. Now the book has a much larger contents section which has been formatted for a more holistic approach. This should now make it easier for electricians to navigate their way through the book to find the regulation they require.

We’ve taken a look through the regulations and highlighted what we think has changed in the new 18th Edition.   

Part 1

There’s only minor changes in part 1, these are slight amendments on information on electrical installation certificate.

Part 2

Chapter 41 – There are a number of significant changes taking place under this section. We’ve highlighted the two we think are most noteworthy.

• Regulation 411.3.3 has been revised and now applies to socket-outlets with a rated current not exceeding 32A. There is an exception to omit RCD protection where, other than a dwelling, a documented risk assessment determines that RCD protection is not necessary.

• A new Regulation 411.3.4 requires that, within domestic (household) premises, additional protection by an RCD with a rated residual operating current not exceeding 30 mA shall be provided for AC final circuits supplying luminaires.

Main changes include further use of RCD’s for domestic households. Including RCD protection for all lighting circuits and socket outlets rated up to 32A when previously 20A.

It’s important to note for domestic properties the regulation has been deleted that allows the use of RCD protection for a single socket outlet to be omitted as a permitted exception.

Chapter 42

Protection against thermal effects

•  A new Regulation 421.1.7 has been introduced recommending the installation of arc fault detection devices (AFDDs) to mitigate the risk of fire in AC final circuits of a fixed installation due to the effects of arc fault currents.

The main changes in this section includes the use of arc fault protection. These work by detecting a fault at a very early stage, reducing the magnitude of the perspective current whilst retaining the maximum permissible disconnection time for the circuit. This reduces the risk of fire for the duration of the fault and is now recommended for fixed electrical installations.

Chapter 44

Protection against voltage disturbances and electromagnetic disturbances

Section 443, which deals with protection against overvoltage’s of atmospheric origin or due to switching, has been redrafted.

The AQ criteria (conditions of external influence for lightning) for determining if protection against transient overvoltages is needed are no longer included in BS 7671. In its place, protection against transient overvoltages has to be provided where the consequence caused by overvoltage. In other instances, a risk assessment needs to be undertaken to decide if the protection is required.

These section mainly sees changes for the electrical design, commercial and industrial electricians. There are no major changes for general domestic installations.

Chapter 46

Devices for isolation and switching

A new chapter has been introduced which focuses on non-automatic local and remote isolation and switching measures for the prevention or removal of dangers associated with electrical installations or electrically powered equipment. Also, switching for the control of circuits or equipment. Where electrically powered equipment is within the scope of BS EN 60204, only the requirements of that standard apply.

Chapter 53

Protection, isolation, switching, control and monitoring

Chapter 52 has been adjusted to concentrate on requirements for protection, isolation, switching, control and monitoring dealing with requirements for selection and erection of devices provided to manage such functions.

Section 534

Devices for protection against overvoltage

This section has been revised with key changes to the selection of overvoltage protection devices.

Chapter 54

Earthing arrangements and protective conductors

This section has introduced two new regulations stating there’s a strong recommendation to install a foundation earth electrode on new buildings.

Chapter 55 

Other equipment

When installing luminaires in the ground, consideration must be given to the tables and standards highlighted in chapter 55.

• Ground-recessed luminaires, the selection and erection of which shall take account of the guidance given in Table A.1 of BS EN 60598-2-13.

Part 6

Inspection and testing

No major changes except for restructure of chapters.

Section 722 Electric vehicle charging installations

The main change in this section is to Regulation 722.411.4.1 which highlights the use of a PME supply with regards to vehicle charging installations. This means PME cannot be used unless you meet (i) (ii) (iii) of 722.411.4.1.

Part 8

Energy efficiency

The 18th Edition does see a whole new section which deals with Sustainability. This is mainly aimed at electrical design.

Overall there are some significant changes coming with the 18th Edition which will impact electricians on site. With the mains points consisting of: protecting against electric shock, protecting against electromagnetic disturbances and voltage disturbance and selection, erection of wiring systems and of course the introduction of energy efficiency.  So this is more than a small amendment or update, and as such electricians will need to update to the latest version of the 18th edition wiring regulations in the coming year. We already have lots of 18th edition course dates live to book online.

Categories: 18th edition